University of Dayton
Academic Catalog 2013-14

The Academic Honor Code

I. Introduction

As a Marianist, Catholic university committed to the education of the whole person, The University of Dayton expects all members of the academic community to strive for excellence in scholarship and in character. As stated in the University's Student Handbook, "The University of Dayton expects its faculty and administration to be instrumental in creating an environment in which its students can develop personal integrity."

To uphold this tradition, the University community has established an academic honor code for all of its students, except Law students who are governed by The University of Dayton School of Law Honor Code. Students are expected to be aware of and abide by the honor codes.

II. The Honor Pledge

The University of Dayton Academic Honor Code: A Commitment to Academic Integrity

I understand that as a student of the University of Dayton, I am a member of our academic and social community, I recognize the importance of my education and the value of experiencing life in such an integrated community, I believe that the value of my education and degree is critically dependent upon the academic integrity of the University community, and so

In order to maintain our academic integrity, I pledge to:

- Complete all assignments and examinations according to the guidelines provided to me by my instructors,*

- Avoid plagiarism and any other form of misrepresenting someone else's work as my own,

- Adhere to the Standards of Conduct as outlined in the Academic Honor Code.

In doing this, I hold myself and my community to a higher standard of excellence, and set an example for my peers to follow. Instructors shall make known, within the course syllabus, the expectations for completing assignments and examinations at the beginning of each semester. Instructors shall discuss these expectations with students in a manner appropriate for each course.

* The term instructor may refer to any faculty or staff member

III. Standards of Conduct

Regardless of motive, student conduct that is academically dishonest, evidences lack of academic integrity or trustworthiness, or unfairly impinges upon the intellectual rights and privileges of others is prohibited. A non-exhaustive list of prohibited conduct includes:

A. Cheating on Exams and Other Assignments

Cheating on examinations consists of willfully copying or attempting to consult a notebook, textbook, or any other source of information not authorized by the instructor; willfully aiding, receiving aid, or attempting to aid or receive aid from another student during an examination; obtaining or attempting to obtain copies of any part of an examination (without permission of the instructor) before it is given; having another person take the exam; or any act which violates or attempts to violate the stated conditions of an examination. Cheating on an assignment consists of willfully copying or attempting to copy all or part of another student's assignment or having someone else complete the assignment when class assignments are such that students are expected to complete the assignment on their own. It is the responsibility of the student to consult with the instructor concerning what constitutes permissible collaboration and what materials are allowed to be consulted.

B. Committing Plagiarism and Using False Citations

Plagiarism consists of quoting or copying directly from any source of material without appropriately citing the source and identifying the quoted material; knowingly citing an incorrect or fabricated source; or using ideas (i.e. material other than information that is common knowledge) from any source of material without citing the source and identifying the borrowed material. Students are responsible for educating themselves as to the proper mode of attributing credit in any course or field. Instructors may use various methods to assess the originality of students' work, such as plagiarism detection software.

C. Submitting Work for Multiple Purposes

Students are not permitted to submit their own or other’s work (in identical or similar form) for multiple purposes without the prior and explicit approval in writing of all instructors to whom the work will be submitted. This includes work first produced in connection with classes at the University of Dayton as well as other institutions attended by the student or at places of employment.

D. Submitting False Data or Deceptive Information

The submission of false data is a form of academic fraud. False data is that which has been fabricated, altered, or contrived in such a way as to be deliberately misleading or to fit expected results. Deception is defined as any dishonest attempt to avoid taking examinations or submitting assignments at the scheduled times by means such as a forged medical certification of absence. Deception also includes falsifying class attendance records or failing to reveal that someone falsified your attendance. Extenuating circumstances such as a personal illness, death in the family, etc. must be negotiated with the instructor.

E. Falsifying Academic Documentation and Grade Alteration

Any attempt to forge or alter academic documentation (including transcripts, letters of recommendation, certificates of enrollment or good standing, and registration forms) concerning oneself or others also constitutes academic fraud. Grade alteration consists of an act which dishonestly modifies a grade obtained for a class assignment, examination, or for the course itself.

F. Abuse of Library Privileges and Shared Electronic Media

All attempts to deprive others of equal access to any library materials constitute a violation of academic integrity. This includes the sequestering of library materials for the use of an individual or group; a willful or repeated failure to respond to recall notices; and the removal or attempt to remove library materials from any University library without authorization. Defacing, theft, or destruction of books, articles or any other library materials that serve to deprive others of equal access to these materials also constitute a violation of academic integrity. Malicious actions that deprive others of equal access to shared electronic media used for academic purposes constitute a violation of the Honor Code. This includes efforts that result in the damage or sabotage of campus computer systems.

G. Encouragement or Tolerance of Academic Dishonesty

The quality of campus and community life is dependent upon the commitment of each member of the University to a shared set of behavioral standards and values. Adhering to the Academic Honor Code is not limited to direct actions, but also includes any behavior that supports, encourages, or tolerates academic dishonesty.

IV. Student Status with Respect to the Academic Honor Code

A. All University of Dayton students, except for Law students who are governed by The University of Dayton School of Law Honor Code, are subject to the Standards of Conduct and procedures of the Academic Honor Code

B. Normally, the maximum penalty for a single proven case of academic dishonesty is an F in the course. No provision can then be made for the student to receive a W. Under some circumstances, such as repeated offenses, theft, intimidation, or breaking and entering, additional penalties may be imposed by the University. These penalties may include dismissal from the major, dismissal from the school or college, removal from the University Honors Program, or dismissal from the University.

C. All honor code violations, as determined by the instructor after consultation with the student, require that the chair of the department or program director in which the incident occurred be notified of the violation by the instructor. If a student accepts the instructor's accusation and/or penalty, the case will be considered resolved and no further action shall be required. The instructor shall send an Academic Dishonesty Incident Report form to the dean(s) of the student’s academic unit(s) – possible double major. If a student does not admit the violation or accept the proposed penalty, the student may contact the chair or program director in which the incident occurred and initiate an appeal process. If the appeal is decided in favor of the student, no report will be placed in the student’s file. If during the appeal process the student is found responsible, the report will be placed in the dean(s)’ offices of the student’s academic unit(s) – possible double major. If the student transfers between academic units, all reports will be transferred to the new dean’s office.

D. If a possible violation is reported after the grade for a course has been submitted, the case will be adjudicated only if the Office of the Provost determines that the alleged offense is of sufficient gravity to warrant consideration. Only matters that could reasonably result in sanctions reflected in a student's permanent record will ordinarily meet the "sufficient gravity" test in this context. The Office of the Provost shall decide on the process of adjudication

E. If a student with a possible violation withdraws, transfers, or is, for any reason, not currently enrolled at the University the University may maintain a continuing interest in, and complete the adjudication of the matter, if, in the judgment of the Office of the Provost, the matter is of sufficient gravity to warrant resolution. The Office of the Provost shall have the discretion to determine whether the adjudication will occur before or after the student's re-enrollment, and the process of adjudication.

F. A student may not graduate with an unresolved Academic Honor Code violation which, in the judgment of the Office of the Provost, is of sufficient gravity to warrant resolution. Certification for the degree will be withheld pending a final resolution of the Academic Honor Code matter. The Office of the Provost shall decide on the process of adjudication

G. If a violation is reported after a student has graduated, transferred, or otherwise terminated his or her enrollment at the University, the case will be adjudicated only if the Office of the Provost determines that the case is of sufficient gravity to warrant consideration. The Office of the Provost shall decide on the process of adjudication. In a case involving a student who has already received a degree, sanctions up to and including the revocation of a degree or certificate are possible. The Office of the Provost has the final authority to revise and implement any sanctions.

V. Appeal Procedure

A student who believes an accusation of academic honor code violation or penalty is not valid may appeal in the sequential manner listed below. If the student does not appeal the decision of the instructor, or accepts the accusation and penalty at any time during the appeal process, the Academic Dishonesty Incident Report form shall be sent to the student’s dean(s) by the instructor.

A. If no resolution occurs in the private conversation with the instructor, the student may appeal to the department chair or program director in which the incident occurred. The student must submit a written account, including a detailed explanation of their actions, along with any circumstances concerning the incident. This appeal must be made within ten business days after meeting with the instructor. The chair may use reasonable means, including meeting with the instructor and student, to reach a determination on the accusation and/or penalty within thirty business days.

B. If no resolution occurs with the department chair or program director, the student has ten business days to file a written appeal to a review committee formed by the department chair or program director in which the incident occurred. The review committee shall be composed of at least two tenured faculty and one student. The review committee will first select a chair, and then meet with the student and instructor involved on separate occasions and gather any additional evidence or information related to this appeal. The student has the right to see and hear the evidence, to question any witnesses against the student, and to present evidence and witnesses on the student's behalf. Both the student and the instructor must cooperate with the review committee. The review committee shall make known its recommendations and the reasons for its recommendations in writing to the department chair or program director, the student, and the instructor within thirty business days.

C. If the student or faculty member disagrees with the review committee's decision, either may then make an appeal to the dean of the unit in which the incident occurred. The dean must make known his or her decision, and reason(s), in writing to the student, the instructor, chair or program director, and department review committee within thirty business days.

D. A final appeal may be made to the Provost within ten business days after the dean’s decision. The Provost must make known his or her decision, and reason(s), in writing to the student, the faculty member, chair or program director, dean, and review committee within thirty business calendar days. The final authority rests with the Provost.

Academic Dishonesty Incident Report