University of Dayton
Academic Catalog 2013-14

Economics and Finance

Majors:

Minors:

The Department of Economics and Finance offers majors in business economics and in finance for students in the School of Business Administration. The department also offers majors in economics and in applied mathematical economics for students in the College of Arts and Sciences (search these majors to view their requirements.) Minors in economics, business economics, and finance are available to all students.

Faculty

Trevor Collier, Chairperson
Professors: Caporale, Chen, Frasca, Ruggiero
Associate Professors: Collier, Gustafson, Mohan, Poitras, Wang
Assistant Professors: Chang, Collier, Schutte, Zhang
Lecturers: Douglas, John, Livesay, Shimmin

Business Economics

Economics teaches students to think analytically about problems that arise in business, politics, and everyday life. The business economics major offers students the strength of economic theory combined with a focus in an area of applied business and develops the student's quantitative skills by requiring course work in econometrics or forecasting. The major is excellent preparation for a wide range of employment opportunities in business, government and education. It also prepares students for graduate study in law, public policy, and business. Students who wish to pursue graduate study in economics should supplement the major with additional mathematics courses or major in applied mathematical economics.

In addition to other requirements, a major in business economics requires: ECO 203-204 (with a grade of C or better), ECO 340 or 346, ECO 410 or 441, ECO 490, 6 additional semester hours of economics electives, and a breadth requirement of 6 semester hours of courses in one other business discipline chosen from a list of approved courses. See the department office for the approved breadth requirement courses. The breadth courses should be chosen to complement the economics electives taken by the student.

Faculty

Trevor Collier, Chairperson
Edmund B. O'Leary Professor of Economics: Ruggiero
Professors: Caporale, Frasca, Ruggiero
Associate Professors: Collier, Gustafson, Poitras
Lecturer: John

Bachelor of Science in business administration with a major in Business Economics (ECB) Minimum 124 credit hours

Common Academic Program (CAP)
*credit hours will vary depending on courses selected
First-Year Humanities Commons 112
The West & the World
Introduction to Religioius & Theological Studies
Introduction to Philosophy
Writing Seminar I 2
Second-Year Writing Seminar 30-3
Writing Seminar II
Oral Communication 3
Principles of Oral Communication
Mathematics 3
Social Science3
Arts3
Natural Sciences7
Crossing Boundariesvariable credit
Faith Traditions
Practical Ethical Action
Inquiry
Integrative
Advanced Studyvariable credit
Philosophy and/or Religious Studies
Historical Studies
Diversity and Social Justice3
Major Capstone0-3

1

 Completed with ASI 110 and ASI 120.

2

Or ENG 100A and ENG 100B, or ENG 200H, by placement.

3

 Completed with ENG 200H or ASI 120.



SBA Core Curriculum
ACC 207Intro-Financial Acc3
ACC 208Intro-Managerial Acc3
BAI 150Bus Educ Planning1
BAI 103LBus Computing Lab1
BAI 151Bus Integratn Exp1
DSC 210Stats For Bus I3
DSC 211Stats For Bus II3
ECO 203Prin of Microecon (Satisfies CAP Social Science)3
ECO 204Prin of Macroecon3
ENG 370Rprt&Proposal Wrtng (Satisfies CAP Inquiry)3
or ENG 371 Technical Commnicatn
or ENG 372 Business Commicatn
FIN 301Intro to Financial Mgt3
MGT 201Legal Envirnmt-Bus3
MGT 301Organiztnl Behavior3
MGT 490Managing the Entrpse (Satisfies CAP Integrative)3
MTH 128Finite Math3
MTH 129Calc for Business (Satisfies CAP Mathematics)3
MIS 301Info Sys in Org3
MKT 301Prin of Marketing3
OPS 301Survy-Oper&Supply Mgt3
PHL 313Business Ethics (Satisfies CAP Practical Ethical Action and Adv Studies in PHL/REL)3
or REL 368 Practical wisdom in the business world
ECO elective (300/400 level)3
Social Science elective (ANT, POL, PSY, SOC)3

 

Major Requirements18
ECO 340Managerial Economics3
or ECO 346 Intrmd MicroEco Anly
ECO 410Bus&Eco Forecasting3
or ECO 441 Econometrics
ECO 490Sr Sem-Applied Eco (Satisfies CAP Major Capstone)3
ECO upper level elective (Satisfies SBA ECO Upper Level Elective)3
Breadth requirements (see Department Chair for approved selections)6

 Business economics majors must earn a grade of C or better in ECO 203 and ECO 204.

Academic Electives to bring total to at least 124 credits

 

Minor in Business Economics (ECB)

Business Economics
ECO 203Prin of Microecon 13
ECO 204Prin of Macroecon 13
ECO 340Managerial Economics3
or ECO 346 Intrmd MicroEco Anly
ECO 410Bus&Eco Forecasting3
or ECO 441 Econometrics
Select two ECO electives6
Total Hours18

1

Students may substitute ECO 300 and one more 300 or 400 level ECO course for ECO 203 and ECO 204.

Finance 

The finance major provides students with a working understanding of the financial decision-making process, how financial markets function, and the acquisition and management of capital. A student may choose a general finance curriculum or specialize in courses relating to investment analysis and portfolio management, financial institutions and services, or corporate financial management. Students will be prepared for a variety of careers in business and in the government sector with work in areas such as financial analysis, capital budgeting, banking, mergers and acquisitions, working capital management, real estate, and insurance. A major in finance is also excellent preparation for graduate studies in business administration or corporate and securities law.

In addition to other requirements, the major in finance consists of FIN 360, Investments; nine semester hours of 400 level finance electives; and six additional semester hours of 300 or 400 level finance electives.  Finance majors must earn at least a C in FIN 301, Introduction to Financial Management.  One of the electives may come from: ACC 305, ECO 415, ECO 488, MTH 490.

Faculty

Trevor Collier, Chairperson
William J. Hoben Professor of Finance: Chen
Professor: Chen
Associate Professors: Mohan, Wang
Assistant Professors: Chang, Schutte, Zhang
Lecturers: Douglas, Livesay, Shimmin

Bachelor of Science in business administration with a major in Finance (FIN) minimum 124 credit hours

Common Academic Program (CAP)
*credit hours will vary depending on courses selected
First-Year Humanities Commons 112
The West & the World
Introduction to Religioius & Theological Studies
Introduction to Philosophy
Writing Seminar I 2
Second-Year Writing Seminar 30-3
Writing Seminar II
Oral Communication 3
Principles of Oral Communication
Mathematics 3
Social Science3
Arts3
Natural Sciences7
Crossing Boundariesvariable credit
Faith Traditions
Practical Ethical Action
Inquiry
Integrative
Advanced Studyvariable credit
Philosophy and/or Religious Studies
Historical Studies
Diversity and Social Justice3
Major Capstone0-3

1

 Completed with ASI 110 and ASI 120.

2

Or ENG 100A and ENG 100B, or ENG 200H, by placement.

3

 Completed with ENG 200H or ASI 120.


 

SBA Core Curriculum
ACC 207Intro-Financial Acc3
ACC 208Intro-Managerial Acc3
BAI 150Bus Educ Planning1
BAI 103LBus Computing Lab1
BAI 151Bus Integratn Exp1
DSC 210Stats For Bus I3
DSC 211Stats For Bus II3
ECO 203Prin of Microecon (Satisfies CAP Social Science)3
ECO 204Prin of Macroecon3
ENG 370Rprt&Proposal Wrtng (Satisfies CAP Inquiry)3
or ENG 371 Technical Commnicatn
or ENG 372 Business Commicatn
FIN 301Intro to Financial Mgt3
MGT 201Legal Envirnmt-Bus3
MGT 301Organiztnl Behavior3
MGT 490Managing the Entrpse (Satisfies CAP Integrative)3
MTH 128Finite Math3
MTH 129Calc for Business (Satisfies CAP Mathematics)3
MIS 301Info Sys in Org3
MKT 301Prin of Marketing3
OPS 301Survy-Oper&Supply Mgt3
PHL 313Business Ethics (Satisfies CAP Practical Ethical Action and Adv Studies in PHL/REL)3
or REL 368 Practical wisdom in the business world
ECO elective (300/400 level)3
Social Science elective (ANT, POL, PSY, SOC)3

 

Major Requirements18
FIN 360Investments3
Select two FIN electives (400 level)6
FIN major capstone course (choose from FIN 479 or FIN 493 to satisfy CAP Major Capstone)3
Select two FIN electives (300-400 level), one may be from:6
Intrm Financial ACC I
Game Thry w/Fin App
Prod Eco&Perf Evltn
Readings

Finance majors must earn a grade of C or better in FIN 301.

 

Academic Electives to bring total to at least 124 credits

Minor in Finance (FIN)

Finance
FIN 301Intro to Financial Mgt3
FIN 360Investments3
Select three FIN electives (at least one at the 400 level)9
Total Hours15

Business ECONOMICS

First YearHours
BAI 1501
BAI 1511
BAI 103L1
ENG 100 (CAP Humanities Commons)3
HST 103 (CAP Humanities Commons)3
PHL 103 (CAP Humanities Commons)3
REL 103 (CAP Humanities Commons)3
MTH 1283
MTH 129 (Satiesfies CAP Mathematics)3
CMM 100 (Satisfies CAP Oral Communication)3
CAP components (generally CAP Arts & CAP Natural Sciences)10
 34
Second YearHours
CAP Second Year Writing Seminar3
CAP Social Science3
ACC 2073
ACC 2083
DSC 2103
DSC 2113
ECO 203 (grade of C or better required for ECB majors)3
ECO 204 (grade of C or better required for ECB majors)3
MGT 2013
CAP components3
 30
Third YearHours
FIN 3013
MGT 3013
MIS 3013
MKT 3013
OPS 3013
ENG 370, 371, or 372 (Satisfies CAP Inquiry)3
ECO 340 or 3463
ECO 410 or 4413
ECB major breadth elective3
CAP Components or General Electives3
 30
Fourth YearHours
ECO elective (satisfies economics elective for ECB major)3
ECB major breadth elective3
ECO 490 (Satisfies CAP Major Capstone)3
PHL 313 or REL 368 (Satisfies CAP Practiical Ethical Action and ADV Studies in PHL/REL))3
MGT 490 (Satisfies CAP Integrative)3
CAP Components or General Electives15
 30
Total credit hours: 124

 

FINANCE

First YearHours
BAI 1501
BAI 1511
BAI 103L1
ENG 100 (CAP Humanities Commons)3
HST 103 (CAP Humanities Commons)3
PHL 103 (CAP Humanities Common)3
REL 103 (CAP Humanities Commons)3
MTH 1283
MTH 129 (Satisifes CAP Mathematics)3
CMM 100 (Satisfies CAP Oral Communication)3
CAP components (generally CAP Arts & CAP Natural Sciences)10
 34
Second YearHours
CAP Second Year Writing Seminar3
CAP Social Science3
ACC 2073
ACC 2083
DSC 2103
DSC 2113
ECO 2033
ECO 2043
MGT 2013
CAP components3
 30
Third YearHours
FIN 301 (grade of C or better required for FIN majors)3
MGT 3013
MIS 3013
MKT 3013
OPS 3013
ENG 370, 371, or 372 (Satisfies CAP Inquiry)3
FIN 3603
FIN elective3
CAP Components or General Electives6
 30
Fourth YearHours
ECO 300 or 400 level elective3
FIN electives9
FIN 479 or 493 (satisifes CAP Major Capstone)3
PHL 313 or REL 368 (Satisfies CAP Practical Ethical Action and ADV Studies in PHL/REL)3
MGT 490 (Satisifes CAP Integrative)3
CAP Components or General Electives9
 30
Total credit hours: 124

Economics Courses

ECO 203. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Hours

An introduction to consumer and producer behavior in a market economy, demand and supply, pricing and firm behavior under perfect and imperfect competition, and the distribution of income. Discussion of current topics in microeconomics may be included.

ECO 204. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Hours

Introductory economic analysis of the macroeconomy; the determination of gross national product, employment, inflation and the interest rate in the U.S. economy. Government policy, money and banking, and international trade are analyzed.

ECO 301. Seminar in Market Economics. 3 Hours

Market solutions to economic and political issues. Topics vary, but may include issues relating to drugs, gun control, environmental concerns, government interventions, economic and political freedom, and others. Team taught course. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203.

ECO 340. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours

Application of economic models to managerial decision making. Topics include demand analysis, forecasting demand, short-run cost analysis, long-run cost and production functions, pricing, and risk and uncertainty. May not get credit for both ECO 340 and ECO 346. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203.

ECO 346. Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis. 3 Hours

Analysis of the theory of consumer behavior, production theory, equilibrium of the firm, price determination in various market structures, distribution of income, allocation of resources, and welfare economics. May not get credit for both ECO 346 and ECO 340. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203.

ECO 347. Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis. 3 Hours

National income accounting and the determination of the level of income and employment; classical, Keynesian, and post-Keynesian models; private, government, and foreign sectors; theories of inflation and economic growth. Prerequisite(s): ECO 204; ECO 203 recommended.

ECO 390. Antitrust Economics. 3 Hours

Study of how economic analysis has been applied in the interpretation of the antitrust statutes. Examines major anti-trust laws and relevant case law; reviews economic theories of market behavior. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203.

ECO 410. Business & Economic Forecasting. 3 Hours

Forecasting techniques, including ARIMA time series models, econometric models, moving averages, exponential smoothing, and time series decomposition, are used to forecast business and economic variables. Data sources, selection of appropriate forecasting tools and models, and evaluation of forecast results are studied. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203, ECO 204; Statistics (DSC 211 or MTH 207 or MTH 367 or MTH 412).

ECO 415. Game Theory with Business Applications. 3 Hours

Introductory course in strategic decision making; provides a thorough discussion of the basic techniques of applied game theory and of systematic thinking in making business decisions. Among the topics covered with applications to business are equilibrium strategies, understanding situations involving conflict and cooperation, auction design and bidding strategy, and bargaining and negotiations. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203.

ECO 435. Economics of the Environment. 3 Hours

Introduction to the economics of the global environment including an analysis of market failure as a cause of environmental degradation. Topics covered include cost-benefits analysis, criteria for public investment, regulation of the environment, and the sustainable global environment. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203.

ECO 441. Econometrics. 3 Hours

Training in the art of making economic measurements from empirical data using regression analysis as the principle tool; use of computer software to estimate and test regression equations; interpretation of results using statistical inference. Prerequisite(s): (ECO 203, ECO 204; differential calculus and basic statistics) or permission of instructor.

ECO 442. Money & Banking. 3 Hours

Principles of money and monetary systems; commercial banking and the role of the Federal Reserve System; monetary theory and policy; the mechanism of international payments. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203, ECO 204.

ECO 445. Public Finance. 3 Hours

The economic aspects of government finance at the local, state, and especially the national level; the behavioral effects of various taxes, efficiency in spending, the changing role of the U.S. government, fiscal policy, and intergovernmental revenue and expenditure programs; emphasis on relating analytical tools to current developments. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203, ECO 204.

ECO 460. Economic Development & Growth. 3 Hours

Study of various dynamic economic theories of growth and structural change; the role of particular factors of production and related noneconomic variables in the development process, primarily, though not exclusively, of Third World nations. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203, ECO 204.

ECO 461. International Economics. 3 Hours

Major issues surrounding international trade and finance, the economic interdependence of nations and businesses, essential theoretical and empirical tools necessary to monitor and analyze international economic phenomena, and the application of these tools to contemporary business problems and issues. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203, ECO 204.

ECO 471. Labor Economics. 3 Hours

Theory of labor supply and demand, human capital theory, and the process by which wages are determined in various factor markets; applications to topics of unemployment, unions, migration, discrimination, and skill differentials. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203, ECO 204.

ECO 480. Sports Economics. 3 Hours

The application of economic analysis to the sports industry. Examines demand and efficiency in the product market; the labor market for professional athletes and mechanisms for restricting competition in that market; problems in achieving an efficient allocation of resources in the sports industry. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203; (DSC 211 or MTH 207) or equivalent.

ECO 485. Urban & Regional Economics. 3 Hours

Treatment of certain theoretical concepts such as location theory and theories of land use and land rent; an economic interpretation for the existence of cities; applying economic analysis to the problems of traffic congestion, pollution, race, poverty, and urban sprawl. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203; (DSC 211 or MTH 207); ECO 346 recommended.

ECO 488. Production Economics & Performance Evaluation. 3 Hours

Intermediate course in theoretical and applied microeconomic production theory; provides a thorough discussion of the basic techniques of applied production theory and performance evaluation of decision making units. Topics include returns to scale, technical and allocative efficiency, benchmarking, environmental costs, and programming. Prerequisite(s): ECO 203.

ECO 490. Senior Seminar in Applied Economics. 3 Hours

Economic analysis applied in an area of topical interest chosen by the instructor; includes the application of theoretical, mathematical, and statistical methods mastered in previous economics courses. This capstone course provides students an opportunity to extend their proficiency in economic analysis through application and discussion in a small group setting. Typically offered during the spring semester. Economics or Business Economics majors only. Prerequisite(s): Twelve semester hours in Economics.

ECO 491. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

Selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent original research thesis under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the director of the program and the departmental chairperson.

ECO 492. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

Selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent original research thesis under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the director of the program and the departmental chairperson.

ECO 494. Seminar. 3 Hours

Subject varies from time to time. May be taken more than once if topic changes. Prerequisites to be announced.

ECO 496. Cooperative Education. 3 Hours

Optional full-time work period off campus alternating with study period on campus. (See Chapter X; consult Cooperative Education Office for details.) Does not count toward economics major. Permission of chairperson required. Economics or Business Economics majors only. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chairperson.

ECO 497. Internship for General Elective Credit. 1-3 Hours

Practical work experience associated with career development and career exploration relating to the student's major. Permission of the department chair or designee required. Does not replace economics courses for the economics major. Economics or Business Economics majors only. Prerequisite(s): Forty-five semester hours of credit.

ECO 498. Independent Study in Economics. 1-6 Hours

Directed readings and research in selected fields of economics. The number of semester hours will depend on the amount of work chosen. The course will involve periodic discussions with faculty and other students in the course. May be taken more than once for additional credit. Prerequisite(s): 3.0 GPA in economics with a minimum of nine semester hours in economics; nomination by faculty; permission of the department chairperson.

Finance Courses

FIN 250. Personal Finance. 3 Hours

Principles and techniques for handling personal financial decisions: personal budgeting, obtaining credit, life and casualty insurance, buying a home, buying an automobile, and savings and investments. For both business and nonbusiness majors. Does not count toward the finance major.

FIN 301. Introduction to Financial Management. 3 Hours

Principles and techniques used by business firms in managing and financing their current and fixed assets; sources of funds within the capital markets; determinants of the financial structure; analytical techniques. Prerequisite(s): (ACC 200 or ACC 207 or ACC 301); ECO 203; junior standing.

FIN 330. Insurance & Risk Management. 3 Hours

Study of the basic concepts of business and personal risks from the standpoint of creation, identification, reduction, elimination, and evaluation of risks; the use of insurance in meeting problems of risk. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 with minimum grade of C.

FIN 336. Principles of Real Estate. 3 Hours

Survey of real estate industry with emphasis on its structure, regulation, growth, needs, financing, and future. Analysis of the methods for determining land use and evaluation of the theories of city development. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 with minimum grade of C.

FIN 360. Investments. 3 Hours

The principles and techniques used by the investor in selecting securities, emphasis on the stock and bond markets; security valuation methods leading to the selection of individual issues; portfolio theory. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 with minimum grade of C.

FIN 371. Financial Markets & Institutions. 3 Hours

Study of financial markets and financial institutions, including the Federal Reserve, interest rate theories, money and capital market securities, interest rate futures, options and swaps, international financial markets, such as commercial banking, insurance, and investment banking. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 with minimum grade of C.

FIN 401. Advanced Financial Analysis. 3 Hours

Advanced study of current developments in financial planning, acquisition of funds, and asset management valuation; policy strategy and techniques in financial decision making. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 with minimum grade of C.

FIN 402. Mergers, Acquisitions, Capital Restructuring & Corporate Governance. 3 Hours

In depth study of company valuation techniques and the influence of the governance structure - the CEO, President, and the Board of Directors - on company value. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301, FIN 360.

FIN 430. Short-Term Financial Management. 3 Hours

Covers several areas of the corporate treasury function with a focus on managing current assets and liabilities to enhance the firm's liquidity, profitability, and value. Specific areas include analyzing short-term financial decisions such as financing inventory and receivables, granting, trade credit, and making short-term investments and short-term risk management for interest rates and foreign exchange. This course introduces students to the techniques and practices used to evaluate short-term financial decisions. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301; (FIN 360 or FIN 401).

FIN 450. International Business Finance. 3 Hours

Introduction to problems facing financial management of international companies, including foreign exchange risk, working capital and capital budgeting decisions for multinational corporations, international financing, accounting and control. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 with minimum grade of C.

FIN 460. Portfolio Management & Security Analysis. 3 Hours

Advanced valuation theory and security analysis; portfolio construction, evaluation, and management. Prerequisite(s): FIN 360.

FIN 470. Fixed Income Securities. 3 Hours

Introduction to the analytical/computational techniques for pricing fixed income securities, interest rate derivatives, and implementing effective portfolio strategies to control interest rate risk and enhance return. Prerequisite(s): FIN 360 or FIN 371.

FIN 471. Management of Financial Institutions. 3 Hours

Integrated and comprehensive analysis of financial institutions that include depository institutions, insurance companies, securities firms, and investment companies. Prerequisite(s): FIN 371.

FIN 475. Commercial Bank Management. 3 Hours

Explores the environment in which banks must operate, the financial statements of banks, and a thorough study of bank management topics which include: asset-liability management, the investment portfolio, sources of funds, and the loan portfolio. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301; (FIN 360 or FIN 371).

FIN 479. Seminar in Bond Portfolio Management. 3 Hours

Theory and practice in active bond portfolio management. Literature and practical issues related to managing a bond fund. Seminar format; students are divided into teams, each responsible for a specific sector of the fixed income market. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301.

FIN 480. Options & Futures Markets. 3 Hours

Study of options, futures, and other derivatives fundamentals, trading strategies, hedging, speculation, and arbitrating, pricing theories, and market regulations. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301; (FIN 360 or FIN 371).

FIN 481. Fundamental & Technical Trading. 3 Hours

The art and science of speculative foreign exchange trading, focusing on spot trading of Euros. Students implement a trading plan in a real foreign exchange environment under a set risk management policy. Students learn to watch the market, analyze profitable situations, and produce winning trades. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301.

FIN 481L. Trading Laboratory. 1 Hour

Prepares students to find positions in proprietary funds, hedge funds, and energy or commodity firms. Focuses on effective communication, résumé writing, interviewing techniques, job negotiation techniques, and the optimal use of e-mail and personal networks and references. Prerequisite(s): FIN 481 or FIN 482 (may be taken as a corequisite).

FIN 482. Energy Markets. 3 Hours

Energy market portfolio skills: physicality of natural gas market, natural gas pricing, natural gas portfolio transactions including hedging, basic risk management. VaR simulation produced, power pricing and risk management, weather hedging, credit derivatives and their use in energy. Oil basics and pricing a tolling agreement. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301.

FIN 483. Applied Options Trading. 3 Hours

Comprehensive and detailed analysis of options-pricing, risk characteristics, and their dynamic behavior in the context of the management of a portfolio of options. The underlying market used is the Euro/US dollar futures. The emphasis is on option strategic trading, position management, and the calculation of option risks and profit optimization. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301, 481.

FIN 484. Advanced Trading Techniques. 3 Hours

Topics include appropriate leverage, when to take profits, when to have a stop loss, and hedging strategies. Students will learn to write short-term trading plans encompassing fundamental news events and technical charting, then implement a longer view. Each student is expected to open a real micro account from $300-$500. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301, 481.

FIN 485. Financial Modeling. 3 Hours

The objective is to strengthen students understanding of selected financial theory topics through the use of Excel and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The emphasis is on applying financial theory presented in other courses. Students learn how VBA significantly enhances the power of Excel. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 and FIN481.

FIN 486. Algorithmic Modeling in Currency. 3 Hours

Algorithmic trading models are developed using spot contracts with Euros and Australian dollars. Students work in teams to implement hedging strategies of non-trending Euro risk with Australian dollars. Teams will meet and work with outside Flyer Forex Fund directors. Students need to be proficient in advanced Excel techniques. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301 and FIN 481.

FIN 487. Bond Derivatives Seminar. 3 Hours

Topics include fixed income basics, bond futures, duration management, the repo market, callable bonds and bond ladders, asset backed securities and death bonds, mortgage backed securities, inflation bonds, Fed fund futures and binary options, and diversification and suitability analysis. Valuable for those seeking to pass level 2 of the CFA exam. Prerequisite(s): FIN 301.

FIN 490. Personal Financial Consulting. 3 Hours

Subject varies from time to time. May be taken more than once if the topic changes.

FIN 491. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

Selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent original research thesis under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the director of the program and the departmental chairperson.

FIN 492. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

Selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent original research thesis under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the director of the program and the departmental chairperson.

FIN 493. Seminar in Investments. 3 Hours

Application of investment theory and techniques in a real-world setting. Students manage a funded portfolio in terms of establishing objectives, selecting securities to buy (sell), and evaluating portfolio performance. Emphasis is placed upon attempting to identify undervalued common stocks. Admission to the course is limited and must be approved by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): FIN 360 and permission of department chair.

FIN 496. Cooperative Education. 3 Hours

Optional full-time work period off campus alternating with study period on campus. (See Chapter X; consult Cooperative Education Office for details.) Does not count toward finance major. Finance majors only. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chairperson.

FIN 497. Internship for General Elective Credit. 1-3 Hours

Practical work experience associated with career development and career exploration relating to the student's major. Permission of department chair or designee required. Does not replace finance courses for the finance major. Finance majors only. Prerequisite(s): Forty-five semester hours of credit.

FIN 498. Independent Study in Finance. 1-6 Hours

Directed readings and research in selected fields of finance. The number of semester hours will depend on the amount of work chosen. The course will involve periodic discussions with other students and faculty in the program. May be taken more than once for additional credit. Prerequisite(s): 3.0 GPA in Finance; minimum of nine semester hours in Finance; nomination by faculty; permission of department chairperson.