University of Dayton
Academic Catalog 2014-15

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major:

Concentrations:

Minors:

Mechanical engineers apply principles of motion, energy, force, materials and mathematics to design and analyze a wide variety of products and systems.  The field requires an understanding of core concepts including mechanics, kinematics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, materials science and controls.  Mechanical engineers use these core principles along with tools like computer-aided engineering and product life cycle management to design and analyze manufacturing plants, industrial equipment and machinery, heating and cooling systems, automotive systems, aircrafts, robotics, medical devices and more.  Today, mechanical engineers are pursuing developments in such fields as composites, mechatronics, nanotechnology, and are helping to create a more sustainable future.

The mechanical engineering curriculum serves as a broad-based education for positions in these diverse fields or for graduate study leading to advanced degrees.  The first part of the mechanical engineering curriculum provides a firm foundation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer-aided drawing and conceptual design, and the humanities.  The second part of the curriculum provides the engineering science fundamentals and laboratory experiences necessary for testing, design, as well as continued learning in the humanities, arts and social sciences.  The final part of the curriculum emphasizes synthesis of knowledge through major design projects.  The curriculum includes sufficient elective courses to permit a concentration in aerospace, energy systems and engineering as well as minors in several other areas.

The education experience, guided by the University of Dayton Catholic and Marianist heritage, seeks to prepare graduates who will:

  •     have the ability to apply mathematics, science, and engineering fundamentals and computational tools to design components, systems and/or processes;
  •     have the ability to design and conduct experiments and analyze and interpret data;
  •     have the ability to communicate their ideas/solutions effectively;
  •     serve as effective team members and leaders;
  •     understand the social, environmental and economic impact of engineering in a global context;
  •     be able to think critically about contemporary issues;
  •     continue their personal and professional development by engaging in lifelong learning;
  •     integrate ethical action, integrity, and service into their profession and lives.
Faculty

J. Kelly Kissock, Chairperson
Professors Emeriti: Chuang, Doepker, Eastep, Eimermacher, Schauer
Professors: Doyle, Ervin, Hallinan, Jain, Kashani, Kissock, Murray
Associate Professors: Altman, Petrykowski, Pinnell
Assistant Professors: Bigelow,Choi, Hall, Heyne, Rumpfkeil
Lecturer: Henrick
 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (MEE) minimum of 132 Credit hours

Common Academic Program (CAP)
*credit hours will vary depending on courses selected
First-Year Humanities Commons 112
West and the World
Introduction to Religious and Theological Studies
Intro To Philosophy
Writing Seminar I 2
Second-Year Writing Seminar 30-3
Writing Seminar II
Oral Communication3
Principles of Oral Communication
Mathematics3
Social Science3
Arts3
Natural Sciences 47
Crossing Boundariesvariable credit
Faith Traditions
Practical Ethical Action
Inquiry
Integrative
Advanced Studyvariable credit
Philosophy and/or Religious Studies
Historical Studies
Diversity and Social Justice3
Major Capstone0-3

1

Completed with ASI 110 and ASI 120.

2

Or ENG 100A and ENG 100B, orENG 200H, by placement.

3

Completed with ENG 200H or ASI 120.

4

Must include two different disciplines and accompanying lab.




 

Major Requirements
CHM 123General Chemistry3
CHM 123LGeneral Chemistry Laboratory1
or PHY 210L General Physics Laboratory
CMM 100Principles of Oral Communication3
ECE 201LCircuit Analysis Laboratory1
EGM 202Dynamics3
EGM 303Mechanics II3
EGR 100Enrichment Workshop (2 semesters)0
EGR 103Engineering Innovation2
EGR 201Engineering Mechanics3
EGR 202Engineering Thermodynamics3
EGR 203Electrical & Electronic Circuits3
ENG 100
  & ENG 200
Writing Seminar I
   and Writing Seminar II
6
or ENG 200H Writing Seminar II
HST 103The West & the World3
or HST 198 History Scholars' Seminar
MEE 101Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (2 semesters)0
MEE 104LComputer Graphics I1
MEE 200Professional Development Seminar (2 semesters)0
MEE 227LComputer Graphics II1
MEE 308Fluid Mechanics3
MEE 312
  & 312L
Engineering Materials I
   and Materials Laboratory
4
MEE 314Computational Methods3
MEE 321Theory of Machines3
MEE 341Engineering Experimentation3
MEE 410
  & 410L
Heat Transfer
   and Thermo-Fluids Laboratory
4
MEE 415Professional Development I0
MEE 416Professional Development II1
MEE 427Mechanical Design I3
or MEE 425 Aerospace Design
MEE 431LMultidisciplinary Engineering Design Laboratory I2
MEE 432LMultidisciplinary Engineering Design Laboratory II3
MEE 433Project Management & Innovation1
MEE 439Dynamic Systems & Controls4
or MEE 440 Flight Vehicle Performance
MEE 460Engineering Analysis3
MTH 168Analytic Geometry & Calculus I4
MTH 169Analytic Geometry & Calculus II4
MTH 218Analytic Geometry & Calculus III4
MTH 219Applied Differential Equations3
PHL 103Introduction to Philosophy3
PHY 206General Physics I - Mechanics3
PHY 207General Physics II - Electricity & Magnetism3
REL 103Introduction to Religious and Theological Studies3
Select one course from:3
Manufacturing Processes
Aerodynamics
Energy Efficient Manufacturing
Electives12
Ethics elective 13
Math/Science elective 13
MEE electives 16
Open electives 16
Total Hours133

1

Select from list approved by the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department.



Concentration in Aerospace Engineering (AEC)

This concentration is open only to mechanical engineering majors. The program provides a strong background for career specialization in the fields of aircraft and aerospace engineering.

MEE 225Introduction to Flight3
MEE 401Aerodynamics3
MEE 409Aerospace Stuctures3
MEE 425Aerospace Design3
MEE 440Flight Vehicle Performance4
Select one course from:3
Propulsion
Approved graduate AEE course
Total Hours19


Concentration in Energy Systems-Mechanical (MRS)

This concentration is open to all engineering students.

Select three courses from:9
Cities & Energy
Environmental Pollution Control
Water & Wastewater Engineering
Economics of the Environment
Environmental Ethics ,Environmental Ethics
Energy & Environmental Physics
Environmental Policy
Global Change & Earth Systems
Sustainability Research I
Any approved Arts and Science energy/sustainability related elective
Select three courses from:9
Fundamentals of Fuels & Combustion
Fundamentals of Fuels & Combustion
Combustion Theory
Propulsion
Energy Efficient Buildings
Design of Thermal Systems
Design of Environment
Renewable Energy Systems
Energy Efficient Manufacturing
MEE 493HHonors Thesis3
Advanced Thermodynamics
Any approved engineering energy/sustainability related elective
Total Hours21

 

Minor in Aerospace Engineering (AAE)

This minor is open to chemical, civil and mechanical engineering majors. The program provides a strong background for career specialization in the fields of aircraft and aerospace engineering.

Select four courses from:12
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Introduction to Flight
Aerodynamics
Aerospace Stuctures
Aerospace Design
Flight Vehicle Performance
Propulsion
Approved AEE related elective
Total Hours12

 

Minor in Mechanical Systems (MES)

This area concentrates on the study of design and analysis as well as modeling and control of mechanical systems.  The activities in this area include, but are not limited to, computer-aided design, kinematic synthesis and analysis, acoustics and structural dynamics, noise and vibrations control, system modeling and identifications, and dynamics systems and control.

Select four courses from:12
Introduction to Industrial Robotic Manipulators
Automatic Control
Mechanical Design II
Biomechanical Engineering
Mechatronics
Special Topics in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering 1
Introduction to Continuum Mechanics
Analytical Dynamics
Theoretical Kinematics
Kinematic Principles in Design
Geometric Methods in Kinematics
Engineering Design Optimization
Advanced Mechanical Vibrations
Computational Methods for Design
Finite Element Analysis I
Total Hours12

 

1

 Approval of Department Chair needed.


First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
MEE 1010CMM 1003
ENG 100 (Satisfies CAP Writing Seminar)3REL 103 (Satisfies CAP First Year Hummanities Commons)3
CHM 123 (Satisfies CAP Natural Science)3EGR 1032
CHM 123L1PHY 206 (Satisfies CAP Natural Science)3
EGR 1000MTH 1694
PHL 103 (Satisfies CAP First-Year Hummanities Commons)3MEE 104L1
HST 103 (Satisfies CAP First-Year Hummanities Commons)3EGR 1000
MTH 168 (Satisfies CAP Math Requirement)4MEE 1010
 17 16
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENG 200 (Satisfies CAP Second Year Writing Seminar)3Social Science (Satisfies CAP Social Science)3
EGR 2013EGM 2023
PHY 2073MEE 3143
MTH 2184EGR 2033
MEE 227L1ECE 201L1
EGR 2023MTH 2193
MEE 2000MEE 2000
 17 16
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
SCI/MTH Elect3Advanced PHL Ethics (Satisfies CAP Crossing Boundaries and Practical Ethical Action)3
MEE 3213MEE 3443
MEE 3123MEE 3413
MEE 312L1MEE 4331
EGM 3033MEE 4103
MEE 3083MEE 410L1
MEE 4150Open Elect3
 16 17
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
Advanced REL (Satisfies CAP Crossing Boundaries Faith Traditions, Diversity and Social Justice)3Advanced HST (Satisfies CAP Crossing Boundaries)3
Art Study (Satisfies CAP Art Study)3MEE 432L3
MEE 4273MEE 4603
MEE 431L2MEE 4161
MEE 4394MEE Elect3
MEE Elect3Open Elect3
 18 16
Total credit hours: 133

Courses

MEE 101. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering. 0 Hours

Weekly meeting of first-semester, first-year mechanical engineering students. Orientation to engineering problem solving and team building through hands on applications.

MEE 104L. Computer Graphics I. 1 Hour

Fundamentals of engineering graphics and the part that graphical communication plays in engineering. Introduction to computer aided design (CAD).

MEE 198. Research & Innovation Laboratory. 1-6 Hours

Students participate in (1) selection and design, (2) investigation and data collection, (3) analysis, and (4) presentation of a research project. Research can include, but is not limited to, developing an experiment, collecting and analyzing data, surveying and evaluating literature, developing new tools and techniques including software, and surveying, brainstorming, and evaluating engineering solutions and engineering designs. Proposals from teams of students will be considered.

MEE 200. Professional Development Seminar. 0 Hours

Presentations on contemporary and professional engineering subjects by students, faculty, and engineers in active practice. The seminar addresses topics in key areas that complement traditional courses and prepare distinctive graduates, ready for life and work. Registration required for all sophomore students.

MEE 225. Introduction to Flight. 3 Hours

An introductory course designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the multitude of disciplines that comprise the aeronautical engineering profession. A background and brief history of flight are covered. Foundational knowledge of aerodynamics, propulsion, aerostructures, aircraft performance and aerospace vehicle design. Laboratory included. Prerequisite(s): PHY 206.

MEE 227L. Computer Graphics II. 1 Hour

Advanced engineering graphics and graphical communication in engineering; introduction to project design. Prerequisite(s): MEE 104L.

MEE 298. Research & Innovation Laboratory. 1-6 Hours

Students participate in (1) selection and design, (2) investigation and data collection, (3) analysis, and (4) presentation of a research project. Research can include, but is not limited to, developing an experiment, collecting and analyzing data, surveying and evaluating literature, developing new tools and techniques including software, and surveying, brainstorming, and evaluating engineering solutions and engineering designs. Proposals from teams of students will be considered.

MEE 308. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours

An introductory course in fluid mechanics. Fundamental concepts including continuity, momentum, and energy relations. Control volume analysis and differential formulations. Internal and external flows in laminar and turbulent regimes. One-dimensional compressible flows. Prerequisite(s): EGR 202. Corequisite(s): MTH 219.

MEE 312. Engineering Materials I. 3 Hours

Atomic structure, bonding, and arrangement in solids. Mechanical and physical properties of solids, phase equilibria, and processing of solids. Strengthening methods in solids, principles of material selection, and characteristics of non-ferrous alloys, polymers, ceramic composites, and construction materials. Corequisite(s): EGM 303; MEE 312L.

MEE 312L. Materials Laboratory. 1 Hour

Conducting mechanical and physical tests on solids including, but not limited to tension, compression, bending, hardness, and impact. Metallographic examination of surfaces. Test standards, data reduction, analysis, interpretation, and written and oral communication of test results. Corequisite(s): EGM 303; MEE 312.

MEE 314. Computational Methods. 3 Hours

Detailed introduction to solving engineering problems through programming in the Matlab technical computing software package. Fundamentals of algorithms, including iterative processes, arrays and logic operations. Graphing of 2D and 3D functions. Graphical user interfaces. Focus on engineering applications that utilize the mathematical techniques of linear algebra, statistics and numerical methods. Corequisite(s): MTH 219.

MEE 321. Theory of Machines. 3 Hours

Analysis and synthesis of mechanisms using analytical and computer-based techniques. Applications include cams, gears, and linkages such as four-bar, slider-crank, and quick-return mechanisms. Gear train specification and force analysis. Position, velocity, and acceleration analysis and mechanical advantage of a wide variety of linkage systems. Corequisite(s): MEE 314 (for MEE), ECE 203 (for ECE), or equivalent .

MEE 341. Engineering Experimentation. 3 Hours

Basic sensors and instrumentation, design of experiments, data acquisition and processing, and uncertainty and statistical analysis of data. Measurement of strain, motion, pressure, temperature, flow and sound. Measurement applications to engineering phenomena or systems. Course will utilize a mix of lecture, laboratory experiments, and demonstrations. Also a term project to provide design of experiment experience. Corequisite(s): EGM 303; MEE 308.

MEE 344. Manufacturing Processes. 3 Hours

Casting processes including casting defects and design of castings; metal working processes such as extrusion, forging, rolling and wire drawing; sheet metal forming; welding processes; powder metallurgy and design principles for P/M parts, metal removal processes; forming and shaping plastics and composite materials; rapid prototyping. Design principles for manufacturability. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite(s): MEE 312.

MEE 398. Research & Innovation Laboratory. 1-6 Hours

Students participate in (1) selection and design, (2) investigation and data collection, (3) analysis, and (4) presentation of a research project. Research can include, but is not limited to, developing an experiment, collecting and analyzing data, surveying and evaluating literature, developing new tools and techniques including software, and surveying, brainstorming, and evaluating engineering solutions and engineering designs. Proposals from teams of students will be considered.

MEE 401. Aerodynamics. 3 Hours

Fundamentals of steady and inviscid aerodynamic flows. Emphasis on force and moment determination for airfoils and finite wings. Prerequisite(s): MEE 308.

MEE 409. Aerospace Stuctures. 3 Hours

Structural properties of wing and fuselage sections. Nonsymmetrical bending of skin-stringer wing sections. Shear stresses in thin-walled and skin-stringer multiple-celled sections. Deflection by energy methods. Introduction to finite element stiffness method. Prerequisite(s): EGM 303.

MEE 410. Heat Transfer. 3 Hours

Fundamentals of conduction, convection, and thermal radiation energy transfer. Conduction of heat in steady and unsteady state. Principles of boundary layer theory applicable to free and forced convection heat transfer for internal and external flows. Radiation analysis with and without convection and conduction. Prerequisite(s): MEE 308.

MEE 410L. Thermo-Fluids Laboratory. 1 Hour

Hands-on opportunities for students to gain knowledge of instrumentation used for temperature, flow, heat, and pressure measurement and to visualize thermo-fluids phenomena in a rich problem solving context. Phenomena to be studied include: boundary layer and separation phenomena, internal flow characteristics, hydraulics, conduction, convection, and combustion. Corequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 413. Propulsion. 3 Hours

Principles of propulsive devices, aerothermodynamics, diffuser and nozzle flow, energy transfer in turbo-machinery; turbojet, turbo-fan, prop-fan engines; turbo-prop and turboshaft engines. RAM and SCRAM jet analysis and a brief introduction to related materials and air frame-propulsion interaction. Prerequisite(s): MEE 308.

MEE 415. Professional Development I. 0 Hours

Presentations on contemporary mechanical engineering subjects by students, faculty, and engineers in active practice; student involvement in professional and service activities. Registration required of all MEE juniors.

MEE 416. Professional Development II. 1 Hour

Presentations on contemporary mechanical engineering subjects by students, faculty, and engineers in active practice; student involvement in professional and service activities. Registration required of all MEE seniors.

MEE 417. Internal Combustion Engines. 3 Hours

Combustion and energy release processes. Applications to spark and compression ignition, thermal jet, rocket, and gas turbine engines. Emphasis on air pollution problems caused by internal combustion engines. Idealized and actual cycles studied in preparation for laboratory testing of I. C. engines. Prerequisite(s): EGR 202 or permission of instructor.

MEE 420. Energy Efficient Buildings. 3 Hours

Provides knowledge and skills necessary to design and operate healthier, more comfortable, more productive, and less environmentally destructive buildings. A specific design target of E/3 (typical energy use divided by three) is established as a goal. Economic, thermodynamic, and heat transfer analyses are utilized. Extensive software development. Prerequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 425. Aerospace Design. 3 Hours

Capstone Air Vehicle Design project that involves both individual and team-based conceptual and preliminary design and sizing. This course integrates the knowledge acquired from the disciplinary subjects already taken (aerodynamics, aerospace structures, propulsion, flight dynamics and intro to flight) in order to size an air vehicle based on a set of requirements. Prerequisite(s): (MEE 225, MEE 401) or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): MEE 409, 431L.

MEE 427. Mechanical Design I. 3 Hours

Stress and deflection analysis of machine components; theories of failure; fatigue failure of metals. Design and analysis of mechanical components such as gears, shafts, bearings and springs. Prerequisite(s): EGM 303; MEE 321. Corequisite(s): MEE 431L.

MEE 428. Mechanical Design II. 3 Hours

Advanced topics in stress and deflection analysis; analysis and design of mechanical elements such as gears, journal and ball bearings, belts, brakes, and clutches; principles of fracture mechanics; failure analysis; machinery construction principles. Contemporary design methods and issues associated with the product development cycle. Prerequisite(s): MEE 427.

MEE 430. Biomechanical Engineering. 3 Hours

Application of engineering principles to clinical, occupational, and sports biomechanics topics. The course focuses on biomechanical analysis, particularly kinematics and kinetics of human movement, with emphasis on both research and product design.

MEE 431L. Multidisciplinary Engineering Design Laboratory I. 2 Hours

Application of engineering fundamentals to sponsored multidisciplinary-team design projects. In a combination of lecture and lab experiences, students learn the product realization process and project management. Product realization topics include idea generation, proposal development, design specifications, conceptualization and decision analysis. Project management topics include cost estimation and intellectual property management. Design projects progress to the proof of concept and prototype development stages. Prerequisite(s): MEE students: EGM 303, MEE 321, and MEE 344 ECE students: ECE 304 and ECE 314.

MEE 432L. Multidisciplinary Engineering Design Laboratory II. 3 Hours

One hour lecture and five hours of lab per week. Focus of the lecture is on engineering project management, including communication, collaboration, project tracking methods, cost estimating, overhead, direct labor, time value of money, depreciation and return on community based sponsors. Detailed evaluation of the Product Realization Process focusing on conceptual design, embodiment design, final design and prototyping. Analysis of the design criteria for safety, ergonomics, environment, cost and sociological impact. Periodic oral and status reports. Culminates in a comprehensive written report and oral presentation. Prerequisite(s): MEE 425 or MEE 427.

MEE 433. Project Management & Innovation. 1 Hour

Introduces students and teams to project management, entrepreneurship, and innovation. Topics include project management,cost estimating, time value of money, patent law, marketing, finance, and business plan development. Prerequisite(s): Junior status.

MEE 434. Mechatronics. 3 Hours

Emphasis on the integration of sensors, micro-controllers, electromechanical actuators, and control theory in a 'smart' system for a semester long design project. Topics include: sensor signal processing, electromechanical actuator fundamentals, interfacing of sensors and actuators to micro-controllers, digital logic, and programming of micro-controllers, programmable logic controllers and programmable logic devices. Equal mix of lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite(s): ECE 323.

MEE 438. Robotics & Flexible Manufacturing. 3 Hours

Overview of industrial robots; physical configuration, operation, and programming of robots; actuators, drive mechanisms, sensors, vision systems, controls, and control methods for robots; economic considerations; and automated factory concept. Prerequisite(s): MEE 321.

MEE 439. Dynamic Systems & Controls. 4 Hours

Dynamic systems modeling with special emphasis on mechanical systems (one and two degrees of freedom). Covers both transfer function and state space modeling techniques. Analogues drawn between mechanical, electrical, fluid, and thermal physical domains. System nonlinearities and model linearization methods are discussed. Analytical solutions of linear ordinary differential equations using Laplace transformation and state space theory. Feedback control theory, including root locus and frequency response techniques. Prerequisite(s): EGM 202; MTH 219.

MEE 440. Flight Vehicle Performance. 4 Hours

This course is intended to introduce the student to the flight mechanics of aerospace vehicles. Some familiarity with aircraft performance, static stability and control is assumed, but not required. We will use modern analysis methods to develop the topical details including: 1) a study of aerodynamics involved in-flight vehicle motion to obtain an understanding of influence coefficients; 2) use of linear algebra to develop a rational approach to modeling aircraft dynamics; 3) an introduction to modern control theory methodology; and 4) problems and examples that illustrate the use of desktop computational tools currently available. Prerequisite(s): (EGM 202; MEE 401, MEE 225; MTH 219) or permission of instructor.

MEE 456. Energy Systems Engineering. 3 Hours

This course is aimed at providing fundamental knowledge of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer in context of Energy Systems Engineering. A Just-in-Time approach to learning and applying these topics will be used. Projects will anchor all class activities. In addition to providing knowledge and experience of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer, this course seeks to provide students the analysis skills necessary to determine the importance of energy conversion technologies, with special emphasis on energy efficiency and renewable energy (tidal, hydroelectric, wind, solar and geothermal). Corequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 457. Building Energy Informatics. 3 Hours

The focus of the course is the collection and analysis of energy data sets to reduce energy consumption and/or energy demand. Students will typically utilize monthly energy data from multiple buildings, real time energy data, and building energy audit data. Students will disaggregate/aggregate data to develop energy use benchmarks, identify priority buildings/actions for energy reduction, identify problems, and estimate savings. Programming in Matlab and an introduction to sql dbase management are covered. Corequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 460. Engineering Analysis. 3 Hours

Case study approach to engineering problem solving. Emphasis on breaking down problems to tractable parts, modeling physical systems and selection of solution techniques. Problems related to thermal, fluid, structural, and dynamic systems. Problems typically involve solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, Fourier analysis of periodic behavior, simulation, optimization and/or statistical analysis. Analytical and numerical solution techniques, with an emphasis on selecting the most appropriate technique and understanding the limitations of the analysis. Prerequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 461. Solar Energy Engineering. 3 Hours

This course will cover the theory, design and application of two broad uses of solar energy: (i) direct thermal and (ii) electrical energy generation. The majority of the course will focus on thermal applications, with emphasis on system simulation and design for buildings and other systems. This course will expose students to the development and use of solar design and simulation tools. Most of the tools will be implemented in Excel and TRNSYS, but students are welcome to use other software tools such as Engineering Equation Solver, (EES) or MATLAB. Some of the class time will be devoted to demonstrate the development and use of these tools to solve homework problems. Corequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 462. Geothermal Energy Engineering. 3 Hours

This course will cover the theory and design of three broad uses of geothermal energy: (i) heat pump applications, (ii) direct uses, and (iii) electrical energy generation. The majority of the course will focus on heat pump applications, with emphasis on ground heat exchanger simulation and design for buildings and other systems. Closed-loop, open-loop, and hybrid geothermal heat pump systems will be examined. Heating, cooling, and electricity generating applications using hot geothermal reservoirs will also be discussed. This course will expose students to the development and use of geothermal design and simulation tools. Most of the tools will be implemented in Excel, but students are welcome to use other software tools such as Engineering Equation Solver (EES) or MATLAB. The course notes explain the development and use of these tools, which will be used to solve homework problems. Corequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 463. Wind Energy Engineering. 3 Hours

Introduction to wind energy engineering, including wind energy potential and its application to power generation. Topics include wind turbine components; turbine fluid dynamics and aerodynamics; turbine structures; turbine dynamics, wind turbine controls; fatigue; connection to the electric grid; maintenance; web site assessment; wind economics; and wind power legal, environmental, and ethical issues. Corequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 464. Sustainable Energy Systems. 3 Hours

Survey of conventional fossil-fuel and renewable energy with an emphasis on system integration. Basic concepts of climate physics will be addressed along with estimates of fossil resources. Corequisite(s): MEE 410.

MEE 471. Design of Thermal Systems. 3 Hours

This course integrates thermodynamics, heat transfer, engineering economics, and simulation and optimization techniques in a design framework. Topics include design methodology, energy analysis, heat exchanger networks, thermal-system simulation and optimization techniques.

MEE 472. Design of Environment. 3 Hours

Emphasis on design for environment over the life cycle of a product or process, including consideration of the mining, processing, manufacturing, use, and post-life stages. Course provides knowledge and experience in invention for the purpose of clean design, life cycle assessment strategies to estimate the environmental impact of products and processes, and cleaner manufacturing practices. Course includes a major design project.

MEE 473. Renewable Energy Systems. 3 Hours

Introduction to the impact of energy on the economy and environment. Engineering models of solar thermal and photovoltaic systems. Introduction to wind power. Fuel cells and renewable sources of hydrogen.

MEE 478. Energy Efficient Manufacturing. 3 Hours

This course presents a systematic approach for improving energy efficiency in the manufacturing sector. Current patterns of manufacturing energy use, the need for increased energy efficiency, and models for sustainable manufacturing are reviewed. The lean-energy paradigm is applied to identify energy efficiency opportunities in industrial, electrical, lighting, space conditioning, motor drive, compressed air, process heating, process cooling, and combined heat and power systems. Prerequisite(s): (EGR 202 or equivalent) or permision of instructor.

MEE 490. Special Topics in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering. 3 Hours

Particular assignments to be arranged and approved by the department chairperson.

MEE 493H. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

Selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original research study resulting in a document prepared for submission as a potential publication and a completed undergraduate thesis. Restricted to students in University Honors Program.

MEE 494H. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

Selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original research study resulting in a document prepared for submission as a potential publication and a completed undergraduate thesis. Restricted to students in University Honors Program. Prerequisite(s): MEE 493.

MEE 498. Research & Innovation Laboratory. 1-6 Hours

Students participate in (1) selection and design, (2) investigation and data collection, (3) analysis, and (4) presentation of a research project. Research can include, but is not limited to, developing an experiment, collecting and analyzing data, surveying and evaluating literature, developing new tools and techniques including software, and surveying, brainstorming, and evaluating engineering solutions and engineering designs. Proposals from teams of students will be considered.

MEE 498H. Research&Innvtn Lab. 1-6 Hours

Students participate in (1) selection and design, (2) investigation and data collection, (3) analysis, and (4) presentation of a research project. Research can include, but is not limited to, developing an experiment, collecting and analyzing data, surveying and evaluating literature, developing new tools and techniques including software, and surveying, brainstorming, and evaluating engineering solutions and engineering designs. Proposals from teams of students will be considered.

MEE 499. Special Problems in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering. 1-6 Hours

Particular assignments to be arranged and approved by department chairperson.