University of Dayton
Academic Catalog 2013-14

Political Science

Majors:

Minors:

The Department of Political Science offers the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Political Science and the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Human Rights Studies. Minors in political science and human rights studies are also offered.

  • A major in political science requires thirty-nine semester hours of political science courses.
  • A major in human rights studies requires forty-five to fifty-seven semester hours of courses in the humanities and the social sciences.
  • A minor in political science consists of fifteen semester hours. Courses selected by students should strengthen academic or career objectives.
  • A minor in human rights studies consists of eighteen semester hours. Courses selected should strengthen academic or career objectives.
Minors and Area Concentrations for Majors

A student majoring in political science may elect licensure in education (see EDT) or a minor in any related discipline within the College of Arts and Sciences. The student must consult with the department administering the discipline for the particular requirements of a minor. Students majoring in political science may elect to develop a multidisciplinary concentration in an area of interest including:

  • Prelaw
  • International affairs
  • Public administration and urban affairs
  • Political journalism
  • Others developed by the student in conjunction with his or her advisor
Faculty

Jason Pierce, Chairperson
Director of Human Rights Studies Program: Natalie Hudson
Director of Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit & Community Leadership: Steve Neiheisel
Professors Emeriti: Ahern, Fogel, Inscho, Karns, Kerns, Lapitan, Nelson
Professor: Ingram
Associate Professors: Bilocerkowycz, Ensalaco, Ghere, Hudson, Miller, Neeley, Pierce
Assistant Professors: Ambrosius, Budabin, Pautz, Watkins
Lecturers: Birdsong, Neiheisel, Talbott

 

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Human Rights Studies STUDIES (hrs) Minimum 124 Hours

The Bachelor of Arts in Human Rights Studies is an integrated pre-professional degree firmly grounded in the traditional liberal arts. Students, faculty, and staff participating in the program enter into it guided by their fundamental commitment to respect and promote the dignity of each human person. The degree is intended to produce intellectually adept students who are capable of performing rigorous research and conducting high quality analysis of critical questions in the area of human rights studies. It is equally intended to produce thoughtful and transformational servant-leaders who will apply the knowledge and skills obtained in the program to contemporary human rights issues and situations both domestically and internationally. Through the integration of liberal and pre-professional education, the interdisciplinary program prepares distinctive graduates who intend to pursue advanced study and training in the field of human rights, or careers in human rights advocacy and humanitarian assistance. Those graduates will possess the values, knowledge and skills necessary for effective public service in:

  • Government agencies
  • Non-governmental organizations
  • International aid agencies
  • Non-profit groups in human rights or humanitarian assistance

Courses taken for the major may also count toward completion of the Common Academic Program and the Liberal Studies Curriculum.

Common Academic Program (CAP)
*credit hours will vary depending on courses selected
First-Year Humanities Commons 112
The West & the World
Introduction to Religioius & Theological Studies
Introduction to Philosophy
Writing Seminar I 2
Second-Year Writing Seminar 30-3
Writing Seminar II
Oral Communication 3
Principles of Oral Communication
Mathematics 3
Social Science3
Arts3
Natural Sciences7
Crossing Boundariesvariable credit
Faith Traditions
Practical Ethical Action
Inquiry
Integrative
Advanced Studyvariable credit
Philosophy and/or Religious Studies
Historical Studies
Diversity and Social Justice3
Major Capstone0-3

1

 Completed with ASI 110 and ASI 120.

2

Or ENG 100A and ENG 100B, or ENG 200H, by placement.

3

 Completed with ENG 200H or ASI 120.



Liberal Studies Curriculum
Creative and Performing Arts (May include CAP Arts)3
L2 Proficiency (Proficiency in a language other than English) 10-11
Literature (May include CAP Components)3
Mathematics, excluding MTH 205 (Satisfies CAP Mathematics)3
Natural Sciences (Satisfies CAP Natural Sciences)11
Social Sciences (Includes CAP Social Science)12

Major Requirements 245
ASI 397Hum Rights Advocacy (Satisfies CAP Major Capstone)3
CMM 355Rhetoric-Soc Movements3
HST 312Age-Democratc Revl3
PHL 371Phl & Human Rights3
POL 305Intro To Public Adm3
POL 333Pol of Human Rghts3
POL 334Pol-Human Rights II3
POL 406Internatnl Law&Organ3
REL 363Faith & Justice3
SOC 371Soc of Human Rights3
Select one course from:3
Statistcl Mthd-Comm
Research Seminar
Political Analysis
Social Resrch Methds
Select one course from three different concentrations:9
Anthropology
Cultures-South Asia
Criminal Justice Studies
Comp Crim Jus Systms
Economics
Eco Develop & Growth
History
Hst Pal-Isrl Cflct
Hst Afr-19th Cn-Pr
Women in Third World
US Legl/Const Hst II
Hst Blks-US s/1900
Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Ethics&Modern War
Philosophy of Peace
Political Philosophy
Values & Economics
Political Science
Political Issues 3
20th Cent Pol Thgt
Ntlsm & Ethno Poltcs (Satisfies CAP Social Science)
Leadership in NGO
Civil Liberties
Political Violence
Religious Studies
Liberation Theology
Christian Ethics
The Holocaust
Sociology
Law & Society
Racial&Eth Minorties
Social Inequality
Soc of Extremism
Immigration
Soc of Globalization
Spanish
Spn&Ibero-Amr Cinema
Spn&Ibero-Amr Cinema
Experiential or Research Requirement3-6
Select one course from:
Independent Study
Independent Study
Directed Research
Independent Study
Internship
Senior Project
Independent Study
Or complete an Honors Thesis (for a total of 6 semester hours):
Honors Thesis
   and Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
   and Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
   and Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
   and Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
   and Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
   and Honors Thesis

Breadth
ASI 150Intr to the Univ Exp1
Total Hours to total at least124

1

Majors must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language by passing a University proficiency examination or by completing a language course at the 141 level or higher with a minimum grade of C in one of the following languages:
    •    Arabic
    •    French
    •    German
    •    Italian
    •    Mandarin Chinese
    •    Russian
    •    Spanish

2

May include CAP Components.

3

This course can only be counted when taught as International Political Economy.


 

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Political Science (pol) Minimum 124 Hours

Common Academic Program (CAP)
*credit hours will vary depending on courses selected
First-Year Humanities Commons 112
The West & the World
Introduction to Religioius & Theological Studies
Introduction to Philosophy
Writing Seminar I 2
Second-Year Writing Seminar 30-3
Writing Seminar II
Oral Communication 3
Principles of Oral Communication
Mathematics 3
Social Science3
Arts3
Natural Sciences7
Crossing Boundariesvariable credit
Faith Traditions
Practical Ethical Action
Inquiry
Integrative
Advanced Studyvariable credit
Philosophy and/or Religious Studies
Historical Studies
Diversity and Social Justice3
Major Capstone0-3

1

 Completed with ASI 110 and ASI 120.

2

Or ENG 100A and ENG 100B, or ENG 200H, by placement.

3

 Completed with ENG 200H or ASI 120.



Liberal Studies Curriculum
Creative and Performing Arts (May include CAP Arts)3
L2 Proficiency (Proficiency in a language other than English)0-11
Literature (May include CAP Components)3
Mathematics, excluding MTH 205 (Satisfies CAP Mathematics)3
Natural Sciences (Satisfies CAP Natural Science)11
Social Sciences, excluding POL courses (Includes CAP Social Science)12

Major Requirements39
POL 200Intro to Pol Science3
POL 201Amer Political Systems3
POL 202Intro Comp Politics3
or POL 214 Intro-Intrntl Poltcs
POL 207Political Analysis3
POL 316American Pol Thought3
or POL 317 Dev-Political Theory
or POL 319 20th Cent Pol Thgt
POL 499Pol Sci Capstone3
Select seven POL courses (May include CAP Components) 1, 221

Breadth
ASI 150Intr to the Univ Exp1
Total Hours to total at least124

1

Including twenty-one semester hours at the 300/400 level.

2

Students earning the B.A. in Political Science may count no more than six semester hours earned on internships (POL 495) toward the fulfillment of the degree requirements in POL. Students may, however, take additional hours of internship credit (POL 495) and count them toward the necessary 124 hours needed for graduation.



 

Minor in Human Rights Studies STUDIES (hrs)

The interdisciplinary minor in Human Rights Studies provides students an opportunity to address issues related to human rights from various disciplinary approaches. The universal nature of human rights issues may directly relate to a major, while in other cases this minor will provide an opportunity for broadening one's exposure to these important topics.

The Human Rights Studies minor requires eighteen semester hours. It is recommended that the required course be taken in the sophomore year. Students should consult with the Director of Human Rights Studies to ensure that the courses selected from the elective pool display a significant degree of coherence. Courses taken from this minor may be applied to other minors and to breadth and general education requirements.

Human Rights Studies
POL 333Pol of Human Rghts3
POL 334Pol-Human Rights II3
Select one course from:3
Phl & Human Rights
Faith & Justice
Select one course from:3
Anth of Human Rights
Soc of Human Rights
Select two courses from: 1,26
Anth of Human Rights
Cultures-South Asia
Immigration
Comp Crim Jus Systms
Rhetoric-Soc Movements
Eco Develop & Growth
Age-Democratc Revl
Hst Pal-Isrl Cflct
Hst Afr-19th Cn-Pr
Women in Third World
US Legl/Const Hst II
Hst Blks-US s/1900
Philosophy of Law
Ethics&Modern War
Philosophy of Peace
Political Philosophy
Phl & Human Rights
Values & Economics
Political Issues 3
Intro To Public Adm
20th Cent Pol Thgt
Ntlsm & Ethno Poltcs
Internatnl Law&Organ
Civil Liberties
Political Violence
Liberation Theology
Christian Ethics
Faith & Justice
The Holocaust
Law & Society
Racial&Eth Minorties
Social Inequality
Soc of Extremism
Immigration
Soc of Human Rights
Soc of Globalization

1

At least one course must be from CMM, HST, PHL, or REL.

2

Select any course that has not been already used to fulfill other Human Rights Studies Minor requirements.

3

This course can only be counted when the topic is relevant to human rights.

 

Minor in Political Science (pol)

Political Science
POL 201Amer Political Systems3
Select four POL courses (300/400 level)12
Total Hours15

Courses

POL 101. Global Politics. 3 Hours

Examination of major problems and trends in world politics such as ethnic and religious conflict, economic integration and inequality, democratization and security issues, as well as the role of regional and international organizations.

POL 200. Introduction to Political Science. 3 Hours

Study of the dominant theoretical approaches, central questions and concepts, and history of political science. Political Science majors only.

POL 201. The American Political System. 3 Hours

Study of the American political system, its attitudinal and constitutional base, its structure and processes.

POL 202. Introduction to Comparative Politics. 3 Hours

Analysis of major concepts and approaches in the study of comparative government and politics.

POL 207. Political Analysis. 3 Hours

Introduction to the basic concepts and processes of research in political science.

POL 214. Introduction to International Politics. 3 Hours

Analysis of the dynamic forces of conflict and cooperation in world politics.

POL 300. Political Issues. 3 Hours

Introductory examination of contemporary political issues selected by the instructor, such topics as welfare, political morality, political campaigns, institutional reform, and political economy.

POL 301. The American Judicial Process. 3 Hours

Study of the judicial process as part of the political system. Focus on the participants (police, lawyers, judges, interest groups, litigants, jurors) and the process (criminal, civil, and appellate proceedings).

POL 303. State & Local Government. 3 Hours

Comparative study of the political institutions, processes, and systems of the fifty states and their effect on the content and administration of selected public policies, programs, and services.

POL 305. Introduction to Public Administration. 3 Hours

Basic principles of organization and management in executive departments of government at all levels; questions of planning, leadership, and control.

POL 306. Public Policy Analysis. 3 Hours

Introduction to public policy-making systems and the methodology of policy analysis; theories of policy formulation, the policy-making process, means for measuring policy effectiveness, analysis of proposals for policy change.

POL 307. The Politics of Bureaucracy & Regulation. 3 Hours

Examination of the nature and meaning of bureaucracy in contemporary American society, its relationship to the private sector, and the devices for its evaluation and control.

POL 308. Morality Policy. 3 Hours

Introduction to the morality-based public policy debate with comparison of morality policy (e.g. abortion, drugs, gay rights, pornography) and traditional forms of public policy; study of the moral basis underlying current political topics and debate.

POL 310. Political Parties, Campaigns & Elections. 3 Hours

Analysis of the history, nature, and function of political parties and their role in the political system in both a domestic and comparative context.

POL 311. Public Opinion & Political Behavior. 3 Hours

The formation, maintenance, change, and impact of public opinion on the American political system; the role of theory and analysis of data in understanding public and political behavior.

POL 313. The American Presidency. 3 Hours

Study of the American presidency, the development of presidential powers, and its leadership role in the political system.

POL 314. Interest Group Politics. 3 Hours

Exploration of the role of interest groups in the American political system through an examination of their internal organization and their roles in the electoral and policy making processes at the national, state and local levels. Prerequisite(s): POL 201.

POL 316. American Political Thought. 3 Hours

An exploration and critical investigation of selected actors, thinkers, texts, ideas and movements in American political thought and theory from the colonial period to the present. Topics may include the founding, the age of Jackson, the Civil War, Progressivism, Women's Suffrage, the New Deal, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the 1960s, and others.

POL 317. Development of Political Theory. 3 Hours

Analysis of selected theorists and political doctrines forming the tradition of Western thought on politics. Theorists including Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, Spencer, Lenin, Gasset, and Camus presented in their historical and socio-political contexts.

POL 318. Public Integrity & Political Leadership. 3 Hours

Analysis of contemporary leadership issues related to integrity and values in political office-holding, public service, and global governance contexts. Prerequisite(s): CMM 201 or (POL 201 or POL 202 or POL 214) or permission of instructor.

POL 319. Twentieth-Century Political Thought. 3 Hours

Analysis of selected political theorists, concepts, and movements from the late nineteenth century to the present. Thinkers and concepts may include Marx, Nietzsche, Sarte, Camus, Freud, Arendt, Strauss, the Frankfurt School, Fanon, Foucault, Rawls, Rorty, existentialism, feminism, colonialism, post-modernity, liberalism, neo-conservatism among others.

POL 320. Comparative Politics: Western Europe. 3 Hours

Analysis of governmental institutions and political processes of Western Europe.

POL 321. Comparative Politics: Russia & the New States. 3 Hours

Analysis of governmental institutions and political processes of Russia and the New States.

POL 323. Comparative Politics: Latin America. 3 Hours

Analysis of governmental institutions and political processes of Latin America.

POL 331. Nationalism & Ethnopolitics. 3 Hours

An analysis of the politics of nationalism and ethnicity and their impact on social justice. Diverse case studies (US, Russia, Northern Ireland, Israeli-Palestinian) and institutions (European Community, United Nations) will be explored.

POL 333. Politics of Human Rights. 3 Hours

Examines the evolution of international human rights norms and the creation of the institutions for the protection and promotion of human rights, and case material relating to each category of internationally recognized human rights.

POL 334. Politics of Human Rights II. 3 Hours

This research seminar examines select topics related to the protection and promotion of human rights. This course is required for all Human Rights Studies majors. The research seminar adopts a case-study approach that enables students to analyze the complex social, economic, cultural, and political factors that impede the full realization of internationally recognized human rights, and to critically evaluate the effectiveness of the advocacy strategies used by inter-governmental human rights bodies and non-governmental human rights organizations. Thus, this seminar is designed to enable students to connect human rights theory and practice. Part I (Overview) provides a more in-depth examination of the material covered in POL 333 (the Politics of Human Rights I). Part II (Case Studies) examines critical contemporary issues and covers the full range of civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights. Students will collaborate on team research projects and produce a final Human Rights Report containing an analysis of a specific situation of the violation of human rights, findings of fact, and recommendations aimed at rectifying the situation. Students will present and defend their team reports and present in class at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): POL 333.

POL 335. United States National Security Policy. 3 Hours

Analysis of various political, economic, and military issues and problems relating to U.S. national security.

POL 340. Gender & International Relations. 3 Hours

An examination of feminist approaches to the study of international politics and the influence of gender roles on notions of international peace, security, power, development, democracy, human rights, transnational advocacy, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite(s): (POL 101 or POL 214) or permission of instructor.

POL 350. Legislative Politics. 3 Hours

Study of the U.S. Congress, its organization and procedures, and its powers and influence in the political system.

POL 360. Urban Politics & Policy. 3 Hours

Study of the nature of urban political systems in the U.S. with emphasis on explanation of differences in their policy responses.

POL 361. Leadership in Nongovernmental Organizations. 3 Hours

Examines management skills required of professionals in various types of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and how leaders integrate agency values and management processes to promote rights-related missions. HRS and POL majors or minors only or permission of the department chairperson.

POL 365. Disaster Policy & Administration. 3 Hours

Exploration of policy approaches and administrative response strategies related to various phases of disasters and security crises in the U.S. and international settings with attention to human rights issues. Prerequisite(s): POL 201 or permission of instructor.

POL 371. Environmental Policy. 3 Hours

Examination of environmental public policymaking and implementation in the U.S. and in the international arena. Analysis of domestic and international government responses to specific environmental issues.

POL 404. United States - Latin American Relations. 3 Hours

This course examines the foreign relations of the United States with other countries of the Western hemisphere. Political, economic and security issues are examined from both theoretical and historical perspectives. Prerequisite(s): (POL 210 or POL 214) or permission of instructor.

POL 406. International Law & Organization. 3 Hours

Study of rules governing the community of nations; their nature, sources, and development; the international agencies responsible for their development, interpretation, and administration. Prerequisite(s): POL 214 or permission of instructor.

POL 408. American Foreign Policy. 3 Hours

Critical study of the American foreign policy process and evaluation of the sources of American foreign policy. Prerequisite(s): (POL 201, POL 214) or permission of instructor.

POL 409. Russian Foreign Policy. 3 Hours

Analysis of the internal and external factors shaping the foreign policies of Russia and the independent republics.

POL 410. Comparative Foreign Policy. 3 Hours

Comparative analysis of the foreign policies of major states with emphasis on the process of policy development and on the national and international determinants of policy behaviors. Prerequisite(s): (POL 202 or POL 217) or permission of instructor.

POL 411. Constitutional Law. 3 Hours

Analysis of the role of the U.S. Supreme Court in its interpretation of the Constitution. Emphasis on the various methods of judicial interpretation as they affect such provisions as the commerce clause, the taxing and spending powers, due process, the dimensions of presidential and congressional authority, and the doctrine of judicial review. Prerequisite(s): POL 301 or permission of instructor.

POL 412. Comparative Law. 3 Hours

Explores how foreign judicial systems protect and promote civil and political rights through different constitutional designs. Prerequisite(s): POL 301.

POL 413. The Politics of Bureaucracy & Regulation. 3 Hours

Examination of the nature and meaning of bureaucracy in contemporary American society and the devices for its evaluation and control.

POL 421. Seminar in Political Science. 3 Hours

Seminar on current problems and issues in political science. May be taken more than once when content changes. Prerequisite(s): Political Science major; completed POL core courses.

POL 426. Leadership in Building Communities. 3 Hours

Investigation of the processes by which urban neighborhoods develop themselves from the inside out. Students cultivate their own interdisciplinary appreciation of urban communities through extensive interaction with one neighborhood's visioning process. Topics include asset-based community development, social capital, citizenship, adaptive leadership, and community building strategies and tools.

POL 431. Independent Study & Research. 1-3 Hours

Individual reading and research on selected topics under faculty direction. Recommended for seniors only. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor or department chairperson.

POL 450. Civil Liberities. 3 Hours

Analytical examination of civil liberties in the U.S. with emphasis on the Supreme Court as arbiter in the endless conflict between the demand for individual liberty and the needs of constitutional authority. Prerequisite(s): (POL 301 or POL 411) or permission of instructor.

POL 452. Political Violence. 3 Hours

Consideration of theoretical approaches to understanding violent change in political institutions; the continuum between violence and nonviolence; revolution, revolt, campus dissent, and political assassination. Prerequisite(s): (POL 202 or POL 333) or permission of instructor.

POL 477. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

First of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and department chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approval of University Honors Program.

POL 478. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

Second of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and department chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approved 477; approval of University Honors Program.

POL 479. Selected Topics in Public Policy. 3 Hours

Intensive examination of policy process, outcomes, and impact in an area or areas of American public policy selected by the instructor; such topics as transportation, education, welfare, national defense, urban and community development, civil rights, and science and technology. May be repeated once when topic changes.

POL 495. Internship. 1-9 Hours

Supervised experience in government agencies and programs. Prelaw students are assigned to law firms and judicial chambers. Prerequisite(s): Permission of supervising professor.

POL 497. Service Learning Experience. 1 Hour

Supervised community research or service experience that complements a specific upper division course in Political Science. Repeatable up to three semester hours. No more than three semester hours of Social Science 497 credits can count toward graduation. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): A 300-400 Political Science course.

POL 499. Political Science Capstone. 3 Hours

Project and presentation in the scholarship, activity and/or practice related to the major. Students will present their work in a forum appropriate to the major.