University of Dayton
Academic Catalog 2014-15

Military Science ROTC

The Department of Military Science offers the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program on the campus, providing instruction in general military subjects applicable to all branches of the Army. The purpose of the Reserve Officers Training Corps is to develop selected college-educated men and women for positions of responsibility as officers in the active Army, the Army Reserve, and the Army National Guard.

The military science program is designed to develop a high degree of personal honor, self-reliance, and leadership and to provide the means of becoming better informed on matters of national defense. The program provides men and women who are working toward a baccalaureate degree the opportunity to become officers in the United States Army.

The four-year program is divided into a basic course1 (normally first and second years) and an advanced course (normally third and fourth years), and it is offered to all students for academic credit.

The basic course emphasizes practical leadership techniques and management concepts that apply equally in both military organizations and private industry. While in this phase of the program, students, other than contracted ROTC scholarship students, have no military obligation and are simply taking ROTC courses, like any other college courses, for credit. Students who receive credit for the basic course and demonstrate a potential for becoming effective officers may continue to pursue a commission by enrolling in the advanced course.

The advanced course is designed to prepare students to be Army lieutenants by including practical work in tactics, training, management, leadership techniques, and the exercise of command. Advanced course students are paid $450 (juniors) and $500 (seniors) a month during the school year. During the summer between the junior and senior years, cadets enroll in a thirty day Leadership Development Assessment Course (LDAC), which allows them to apply the leadership and technical training learned in the classroom. While at LDAC, students are paid half a second lieutenant's monthly salary or about $1200.

In addition to ROTC instruction, a student must attain an equal level of professional military education. Army officers, like other professionals, cannot be satisfied with a collection of knowledge found only in their academic field. In order to be prepared to become officers, students are required to complete a course in military history.

The minor in military science provides students with the opportunity to study the theory and practice of the military profession. The minor consists of twelve semester hours of upper-level courses.

Students desiring to minor in military science should notify their respective deans and the Department of Military Science.

The ROTC program is also available to students with three or two years remaining on campus, including graduate students. Special programs, such as ROTC summer Leader's Training Course (LTC), have been established to allow second-semester sophomores and juniors or seniors who will be going on to graduate school to participate in the military science program.

There is also a special program whereby veterans and JROTC students can receive advanced placement credit in Army ROTC. Veterans and students with high school JROTC training, with the approval of the chairperson of the Department of Military Science, may receive placement credit for part or all of the basic course. Each case will be judged individually so that the best interests of both the student and the military may be served.

Army ROTC scholarships are available to students. These scholarships cover four, three, and two-year periods and provide for full tuition and charges, $1200 a year for books, and a tax-free subsistence allowance of $300 a month for first year cadets, $350 a month for sophomore cadets, $450 a month during the junior year and $500 a month in the senior year for up to ten months. Scholarships, which are highly competitive, are awarded to those who demonstrate outstanding scholarly, athletic and leadership ability.

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1 At Sinclair Community College:

MIL 122, MIL 123
Complete UD requirements for:
Leadership I
Leadership II

MIL 222, MIL 223
Complete UD requirements for:
Map Reading & Small Unit Tactics
Military Leadership
 
Faculty

LTC Daniel Redden, U.S. Army, Chairperson
Professor: Redden
Assistant Professors: Germanceri, McGough
Instructors: Perez, Siler

 

Minor in Military Science (mil)

Military Science, ROTC
MIL 301Leading Small Organizations I3
MIL 302Leading Small Organizations II3
MIL 401Leadership Management & Staff3
MIL 402Applied Leadership & Management3
Total Hours12

Courses

MIL 101. Leadership I. 1 Hour

ROTC programs and opportunities; rappelling, leadership, communications and management skills, and rifle marksmanship. Optional field trips, field exercises, physical training, leadership laboratory and social events.

MIL 102. Leadership II. 1 Hour

Rifle marksmanship, fundamentals and principles of leadership, management techniques for individual, group behavior and leadership dimensions. Optional physical training, leadership laboratory, and social events.

MIL 201. Map Reading & Small Unit Tactics. 2 Hours

Study of basic map reading skills, small unit tactics, movement techniques, weapons marksmanship orientation, and survival skills. Participation in leadership laboratory and two field training exercises. Optional physical training and social events.

MIL 202. Military Leadership. 2 Hours

Interactive study of the fundamentals of military leadership, ethical decision-making, effective counseling techniques, and conflict resolution. Study of the role and branches of the US Army and the role of the commissioned, warrant, and noncommissioned officer. Optional participation in leadership laboratories, field training exercises, physical fitness training, and social events.

MIL 301. Leading Small Organizations I. 3 Hours

Study of the methodology, qualities, and the development of leaders through a series of practical opportunities to lead small groups, receive personal assessments, encouragement, and lead again in situations of increasing complexity. Physical training, leadership laboratory, historical field trip, social events, and field training exercises are mandatory.

MIL 302. Leading Small Organizations II. 3 Hours

Study of emplacement of communications equipment and weapons system. Application of small unit tactics, land navigation-terrain association, operations orders and roles of various branches of the Army. Physical training, leadership laboratory, social events, and field training exercises are mandatory.

MIL 401. Leadership Management & Staff. 3 Hours

Study of military staff functions; how to conduct meetings, briefing, and training; how to conduct various types of counseling; and effective and ineffective leadership techniques. Physical training, leadership laboratory, historical field trip, social events, and field training exercises are mandatory.

MIL 402. Applied Leadership & Management. 3 Hours

Leadership and management studies in professionalism, ethics, and military justice. Various types of military correspondence and the responsibilities of an officer. Physical training, leadership laboratory, field training exercises, and social events are mandatory.

MIL 411. Limited War/Low Intensity Conflict. 2 Hours

This course will identify and discuss the roles and mission of the branches found within the U.S. Army as they relate to limited war and low intensity conflicts. Historical examples of leadership in limited war/low intensity conflicts are identified and discussed. Incorporates the background and experience of resident instructors and presentations by visiting service representatives.

MIL 412. United States Military Today. 2 Hours

This course will identify and discuss the roles, missions, organizational structure and equipment, tactical and strategic employment, and future trends of the Armed Services. Incorporates the background and experience of resident instructors and presentations by visiting service representatives.

MIL 477. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

First of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and departmental chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approval of University Honors Program.

MIL 477H. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

First of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and departmental chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approval of University Honors Program.

MIL 478. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

Second of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and departmental chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approved MIL 477 and approval of University Honors Program.

MIL 478H. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours

Second of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and departmental chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approved MIL 477 and approval of University Honors Program.