University of Dayton
Academic Catalog 2013-14

Management Science

Edward F. Mykytka, Department Chairperson

The program of study leading to the Master of Science in management science is an interdisciplinary program administered by the School of Engineering, with the cooperative support of the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business Administration, and the School of Education and Allied Professions. Applications are invited from college graduates in all fields of study - business, education, engineering, liberal arts, physical sciences, and social sciences. The applicant whose preparation does not include at least three semesters of analytic geometry and calculus will be expected to complete appropriate prerequisite courses prior to admission to the program. Check us out at http://engineering.udayton.edu/programs/management

The management scientist is the manager or staff specialist who is trained in the quantitative methodologies of operations research, systems analysis, and the decision sciences. Graduates must be proficient in problem solving and decision-making, system modeling and optimization and the application of probability and statistical theory to management problems. Graduates must also be familiar with a variety of other topics, such as quality control, inventory planning and control, reliability and maintainability, and system simulation.

The objective of this program is to develop quantitative management skills and capabilities appropriate to each student's needs and objectives. The program emphasizes the practical application of management science techniques in our modern society.

Most courses are simulcast (offered in the classroom at the same time as they are offered via distance learning over the Internet at 11:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m., and 6:00 p.m.). These classes meet twice per week, typically Monday and Wednesday or Tuesday and Thursday. Nearly every course is live in the classroom, live on the internet, and recorded for future reference for the students.

In 2012, U.S. News & world Report ranked our department second in the nation in faculty credentials and training, 26th in student services and technology, and 35th in student engagement and accreditation.

Master of Science in Management Science

The program of study must include a minimum of 36 semester hours consisting of the following:

ENM 500Probability & Statistics for Engineers3
MSC 521Introduction to Operations Research3
MSC 535Applied Operations Research/Management Science3
MSC 572System Simulation3
Group I - Probabilistic Modeling Electives
Select at least two of the following:6
Applied Engineering Statistics
Management of Engineering Systems
Quality Assurance
Design & Analysis of Experiments
Advanced Engineering Design
Reliability Engineering I
Forecasting & Time Series Analysis
Queuing Theory & Application
Group II - Deterministic Modeling Electives
Select at least two of the following:6
Human Factors Engineering
Engineering Economy
System Engineering/Project Management
Production Engineering
Reliability Engineering I
Engineering Organizational Development
Topics in Operations Research
Nonlinear Optimization
Linear & Integer Optimization
Advanced Topics in Optimization
Inventory Theory & Application
System Dynamics I
System Dynamics II
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Introduction to Expert Systems
Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence
Current Problems
Thesis
Twelve semester hours in a cognate field-or additional in-depth MSC courses- appropriate to the student's objectives, as approved by the advisor. Approved fields of study for the cognate field include applied mathematics, artificial intelligence, business administration, computer science, educational administration, engineering, and manufacturing. Two of these courses may be replaced by a 6-semester hour Master's thesis.12
Students admitted conditionally will first take the ENM 503 course and then the ENM 500 course the following term. Grades of "B" or better must be earned in each course so the student can be removed from conditional standing. The ENM 503 course will replace one of the program's free electives.
Total Hours36

When applying for the MSC degree, please note that the Department of Engineering Management and Systems does not require the three letters of recommendation, a personal statement or resume, or GRE results as required by other University of Dayton departments and programs.

CERTIFICATES

Programs of study leading to three graduate-level certificates are also available. These certificates are based on a complete knowledge of calculus. Students seeking any of these graduate certificates must apply to and be accepted for admission into a University of Dayton graduate degree program. All Graduate School policies pertaining to admission apply.

Certificate in Six Sigma

The Certificate in Six Sigma is designed to offer practicing engineers and other technically-educated professionals the opportunity to master Six Sigma concepts by studying their theoretical roots and conceptual foundations through coursework at the graduate level. Upon successful completion, students are expected to be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the statistical concepts underlying the methods & tools of Six Sigma, correctly apply those methods & tools, correctly analyze and interpret the results, and pursue further research or coursework in the area.

The certificate program is comprised of the following four courses:

ENM 500Prob&Stat for Engrs3
ENM 560Quality Assurance3
ENM 561Dsgn & Analy Expr3
ENM 565Reliability Engr I3
Total Hours12


 

Certificate in Systems Engineering

Systems engineering is an interdisciplinary approach and means to enable the realization of successful systems. It focuses on defining customer needs and required functionality early in the development cycle, documenting requirements, and then proceeding with design synthesis and system validation while considering the system as a whole.

The certificate program is comprised of the following four courses:

ENM 505Management of Engineering Systems3
ENM 530Engineering Economy3
ENM 539System Engineering/Project Management3
ENM 582Engineering Organizational Development3
Total Hours12

  

Certificate in Design of Experiments

This certificate is offered to those technical professionals in the engineering and scientific community to furnish them with efficient techniques to solve challenging problems in key processes and product quality experimentaiton and design.

This certificate program is comprised of the following three courses:

ENM 500Probability & Statistics for Engineers3
ENM 561Design & Analysis of Experiments3
ENM 590Case Studies in Engineering Management3
Total Hours9

Courses

MSC 521. Introduction to Operations Research. 3 Hours

This course covers methods, principles and fundamentals of deterministic and stochastic operations research. Emphasis is on the formulation and solution of mathematical models in decision making environments, the search for optimal solutions to these decisions, and the explicit treatment of uncertainty through the use of probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis. Models include linear and non linear programs, inventory and production models, decision analysis, forecasting. and queuing. Corequisite(s): ENM 500.

MSC 522. Topics in Operations Research. 3 Hours

In depth study of the methods, principles and fundamentals of operations research, designed to provide additional depth and breadth in selected operations research subject areas. The selection of topics is based upon their usefulness in solving real world problems and their capability to enhance the student's model-building and model-solving skills. This course will further enable the student to pursue studies in operations research through the elective program, self-study and review of the published operations research literature. Prerequisite(s): MSC 521 or equivalent.

MSC 523. Nonlinear Optimization. 3 Hours

This course concentrates on methods and engineering/management science applications of nonlinear optimization. Both single- and multi-variable methods as well as unconstrained and constrained problems are addressed. The course blends theoretical results such as the Kuhn-Tucker conditions and numerical search techniques such as conjugate directions with applications.

MSC 526. Linear & Integer Optimization. 3 Hours

This course covers advanced topics in linear and integer programming with application to real-world problems. Topics include the revised simplex method, the dual-simplex method, interior point algorithms, duality and sensitivity analysis, decomposition principle, and goal and integer programming. Prerequisite(s): MSC 521 or equivalent.

MSC 527. Advanced Topics in Optimization. 3 Hours

This course emphasizes advanced topics in nonlinear or linear optimization with application to the solution of real-world problems. Topics reflect the state of the art in mathematical programming and optimization. Prerequisite(s): MSC 521; permission of instructor.

MSC 535. Applied Operations Research/Management Science. 3 Hours

This is a capstone course focused on the art rather than the 'science' of problem solving in management science and operations research. Emphasis is placed on the techniques of problem solving and model building, examination of unique problem cases, and a course project requiring modeling, data collection, and analysis. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the management science core courses or equivalent.

MSC 542. Inventory Theory & Application. 3 Hours

In-depth coverage of inventory theory including both deterministic and stochastic models. Topics include EOQ models, quantity discounting, constrained inventory, the fixed reorder point model, the fixed review model, repairable inventory systems, and dynamic inventory/production models. Also discussed are system backorder and availability models. Both public and private sector applications are covered. Prerequisite(s): MSC 521 or equivalent.

MSC 544. Forecasting & Time Series Analysis. 3 Hours

Concentration on statistical techniques for modeling and predicting discrete time-series phenomena, with emphasis on understanding and applying forecasting tools in analysis and management settings. Both classical smoothing methods and the Box-Jenkins methodology for model identification, estimation, and prediction are presented. Prerequisite(s): MSC 500 or equivalent.

MSC 546. Queuing Theory & Application. 3 Hours

Emphasis on application of queuing theory to engineering problems. Machine interference, mathematical queuing models, marketing models, servicing problems, Monte Carlo techniques, and computer simulation models are covered. Prerequisite(s): MSC 521 or equivalent.

MSC 555. System Dynamics I. 3 Hours

Introduction to the methodology for modeling the dynamics of complex engineering, business, and socioeconomic systems. These models are used to study the effect of organizational policies and design in higher-order, multiple-loop, nonlinear feedback systems.

MSC 556. System Dynamics II. 3 Hours

Continuation of MSC 555 with emphasis on the study of large-scale corporate, urban, educational, and ecological systems. Prerequisite(s): MSC 555 or equivalent.

MSC 572. System Simulation. 3 Hours

This course is an introduction to stochastic discrete event simulation of complex systems and human performance. Topics covered include model creation, 2D and 3D animation, the process of generating random numbers and random variables, the analysis of input data, the computer modeling of real systems, validation and variation, and the analysis of simulation output. ARENA is the primary software used and Micro Saint Smart is demonstrated and is the secondary software used.

MSC 573. Simulation of Human Appearance. 3 Hours

This course is an introduction to stochastic discrete event simulation of human performance. Topics covered include model creation, 2D and 3D animation, the process of generating random numbers and random variables, the analysis of input data, the computer modeling of real systems, validation and variation, and the analysis of simulation output. ARENA is the primary software used and Micro Saint Smart is demonstrated and is the secondary software used. Prerequisite(s): Graduate or senior status in the School of Engineering or the College of Arts and Sciences.

MSC 575. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence. 3 Hours

Introduction to the methods of artificial intelligence with an emphasis on engineering design and analysis. Topics include logical and probabilistic reasoning, pattern matching, knowledge representation, search, rule-based systems, natural language processing, and computer vision. Concepts and applications are illustrated with Lisp programs.

MSC 577. Introduction to Expert Systems. 3 Hours

Introduction to the development and application of rule-based systems using an integrated environment of commands, rules, databases, spreadsheets, text processing, and forms. Topics include knowledge representation, inference, search, ID3 algorithm, and logic along with suitable applications and their subsequent implementations.

MSC 579. Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence. 1-6 Hours

Special topics include engineering applications using neural net architecture, object-oriented programming, genetic algorithm and advanced search methods illustrated in Common Lisp and a rule-based environment. Prerequisite(s): MSC 575, 577, or permission of instructor.

MSC 595. Current Problems. 1-3 Hours

Topics of current interest in specialized areas of Management Science.

MSC 599. Thesis. 6 Hours

Thesis in Management Science.