University of Dayton
Academic Catalog 2013-14

Psychology

Carolyn E. Roecker Phelps, Department Chairperson
Roger N. Reeb, Graduate Program and Clinical Psychology Program Director
R. Matthew Montoya, General Psychology Program Director

The Department of Psychology offers two graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts:

  • Clinical Psychology
  • General Psychology

All programs emphasize the integration of theory and research with appropriate applied experience and competence in the development of relevant and original research. This is the product of individual supervision and a low student-to-faculty ratio. The aim of the department is to prepare the student for further graduate studies at the doctoral level, and/or work at the M.A. level in an applied/community, teaching, or research setting. Academic advisors and the department chair will direct students to faculty members who share their specific interests and areas of specialization. Graduate students are encouraged to work with these faculty members on a one-to-one basis.

Assistantships

Graduate assistantships are available on a competitive basis and include a stipend as well as tuition and fee remission. The Department of Psychology also offers a limited number of traineeships to students in the clinical psychology program. The traineeship placements are at local mental health agencies and vary in number and stipend from year to year depending upon the budgets and needs of the agencies participating in the traineeship program.

Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology (clp)

The clinical psychology program is designed with the scientist-practitioner model as its foundation. In addition to a broad academic background and competence in the application of research methodology, this program provides the student with:

  1. theoretical and practical knowledge in the areas of personality, psychopathology, and psychotherapy,
  2. intensive training in the assessment of intelligence and personality,
  3. supervised practice in interviewing and therapeutic intervention, and
  4. the opportunity to emphasize work with either children or adults.

Through practicum experience in various community and clinical settings affiliated with the University, the student can translate classroom learning into practical experience. The clinical program is designed to prepare the student for employment in clinical positions at the master's level or for further study in clinical psychology at the doctoral level, and is accredited by the Masters in Psychology and Counseling Accreditation Council (MPCAC). 

All students enrolled in any of the three programs leading to the Master of Arts with a major in Psychology are subject to the following general requirements of the Department of Psychology.

  1. The number of semester hours and required courses described below.
  2. Demonstration of satisfactory progress toward the degree that includes the requirement that students maintain a minimum average of B (3.00) in coursework. Students who fail to meet this requirement are either placed on academic probation or dismissed from the program.
  3. Students are permitted no more than six semester hours with grades of C or lower. Students who fail to meet this requirement are dismissed from the program.
  4. No more than six semester hours of 400-level courses may apply toward the master's degree, and normally no more than six semester hours of graduate work approved by the department chair may be transferred from other institutions.
  5. Attendance is required at regularly scheduled extra-course seminars on selected issues in psychology and at occasional specialized programs.
  6. Thesis must deal with an approved research problem, incorporating an appropriate review of theory and literature, and demonstrating competence in the application of research methodology.
  7. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional and ethical manner in accordance with generally accepted standards for psychologists. Failure to do so may result in dismissal.
  8. It is the student's responsibility to know and to meet the requirements of the University and of the graduate program.

The Master of Arts with a major in psychology (clinical) requires 46 semester hours consisting of 42 hours of academic coursework, including thesis, and 4 hours of practicum as specified below.  Full-time students are expected to complete program requirements in two years.

Psychology Core Requirements
PSY 501Exprmnt Desgn&Stat I3
PSY 502Exprmt Degn&Stat II3
PSY 510History & Systems3
PSY 599Thesis3
Clinical Core Requirements
PSY 550Intro to Clin Psych3
PSY 551Assmt-Intelligence3
PSY 553Theory&Rsrch-Psych3
PSY 555Thry-Psnlty&Psthrpy3
PSY 556Assmt of Personality3
PSY 564Indiv Psychotherapy3
PSY 565Ethics In Assess PSY3
PSY 569Clinical Practicum1
PSY 573Developmental PSY3
PSY 560Chld Path & Therpy3
PSY 558Group Psychothrpy3
PSY 566Family&Marrg Therapy3
Total Hours46

Notes:

1.  Students complete either PSY 560 Chld Path & Therpy or PSY 558 Group Psychothrpy.

2.  With approval of the Director of the Clinical Program, an elective may be substituted for PSY 558 Group Psychothrpy, PSY 566 FamilyMarrg Therapy, or PSY 560 Chld Path & Therpy.

Master of Arts in COGNITIVE-Human Factors Psychology (exp)

The master's program in experimental-human factors psychology is designed for the student who wishes to integrate the theory, methods, and data of experimental psychology with that of human factors. The overall program is structured to prepare the student for further graduate study in experimental psychology or human factors at the Ph.D. level, and/or for a career as a research applied scientist in human factors psychology. The curriculum stresses integration of knowledge in three key areas:

  1. the theoretical issues and quantitative research methodology associated with perception, human information processing, motor skills, and other psychological processes;
  2. application of knowledge about basic psychological processes to the development of equipment, equipment interfaces, and work environments; and
  3. the tools that the human factors specialist applies to system analysis, design, test, and evaluation.

Emphasis is on the integration of practical experience with course work and research. Students who choose the human factors track will meet the accreditation requirements of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and receive credit toward Board Certification in Ergonomics or Human Factors. The human factors practicum is normally completed during the summer between the first and second years.

All students enrolled in any of the three programs leading to the Master of Arts with a major in Psychology are subject to the following general requirements of the Department of Psychology. Full-time students normally complete program requirements in two years:

  1. The number of semester hours and required courses described below.
  2. Demonstration of satisfactory progress toward the degree that includes the requirement that students maintain a minimum average of B (3.00) in coursework. Students who fail to meet this requirement are either placed on academic probation or dismissed from the program.
  3. Students are permitted no more than six semester hours with grades of C or lower. Students who fail to meet this requirement are dismissed from the program.
  4. No more than six semester hours of 400-level courses may apply toward the master's degree, and normally no more than six semester hours of graduate work approved by the department chair may be transferred from other institutions.
  5. Attendance is required at regularly scheduled extra-course seminars on selected issues in psychology and at occasional specialized programs.
  6. Thesis must deal with an approved research problem, incorporating an appropriate review of theory and literature, and demonstrating competence in the application of research methodology.
  7. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional and ethical manner in accordance with generally accepted standards for psychologists. Failure to do so may result in dismissal.
  8. It is the student's responsibility to know and to meet the requirements of the University and of the graduate program.

The Master of Arts with a major in psychology (cognitive-human factors) requires 39 semester hours, including thesis, as specified below. Full-time students normally complete course requirements in two years.

PSY 501Exprmnt Desgn&Stat I3
PSY 502Exprmt Degn&Stat II3
PSY 510History & Systems3
PSY 599Thesis3
PSY 522Cognitive Psychology3
PSY 529Perception3
PSY 525Cog Neuroscience3
PSY 533Engr Psychology3
PSY/ENM 515Human Factors3
PSY/ENM 532Cognitive Systems3
Select three of the following: *9
Sel Tp-adv Rsrch Mth **
Human Informtn Procs
Psychophysiology
Cognitive Systems **
Hum Computr Interact
Training Sys Dvlpmnt
Team&Group Processes
Experimentl Research
Readings
Total Hours39

*

Courses may be selected from this list or, with permission of the program director, from other graduate courses within the department and from graduate courses/programs outside the department in such related disciplines as engineering or computer science. No more than six semester hours of courses taken outside the department may count toward program credit. 

**

 PSY 506 and PSY 532 may be taken more than once for credit.


Master of Arts in General Psychology (psy)

The Master of Arts in general psychology is designed to accommodate a variety of goals and is structured so that the student gains a basic understanding across a broad spectrum of psychology. The program prepares students for work at the doctoral level and affords the opportunity to develop skills which are viewed positively by prospective employers. The program features empirical research, conceptual analysis and critical methodology in perception, learning, memory, language, problem solving, decision making, developmental, personality and social psychology. A student takes a minimum of two courses in the areas of cognitive, developmental, and social psychology. With the six elective hours, it is also possible to take courses in clinical and human factors, or develop interdisciplinary interests in computer science, education, business, engineering, communication, or biology. The student can concentrate in a particular area of research by working with an individual faculty mentor.

All students enrolled in any of the three programs leading to the Master of Arts with a major in Psychology are subject to the following general requirements of the Department of Psychology.

  1. The number of semester hours and required courses described below.
  2. Demonstration of satisfactory progress toward the degree that includes the requirement that students maintain a minimum average of B (3.00) in coursework. Students who fail to meet this requirement are either placed on academic probation or dismissed from the program.
  3. Students are permitted no more than six semester hours with grades of C or lower. Students who fail to meet this requirement are dismissed from the program.
  4. No more than six semester hours of 400-level courses may apply toward the master's degree, and normally no more than six semester hours of graduate work approved by the department chair may be transferred from other institutions.
  5. Attendance is required at regularly scheduled extra-course seminars on selected issues in psychology and at occasional specialized programs.
  6. Thesis must deal with an approved research problem, incorporating an appropriate review of theory and literature, and demonstrating competence in the application of research methodology.
  7. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional and ethical manner in accordance with generally accepted standards for psychologists. Failure to do so may result in dismissal.
  8. It is the student's responsibility to know and to meet the requirements of the University and of the graduate program.

The Master of Arts with a major in psychology (general) requires 36 semester hours, including thesis, as specified below. Full-time students normally complete program requirements in two years.

PSY 501Exprmnt Desgn&Stat I3
PSY 502Exprmt Degn&Stat II3
PSY 510History & Systems3
PSY 599Thesis3
Select two of the following: *6
Tv/Effects on Chldrn
Developmental PSY
Cogntve Devlp-Chldrn
Select two of the following: *6
Cognitive Psychology
Human Informtn Procs
Perception
Select two of the following: *6
PSY 444Environmtl Psychlgy3
PSY 537Team&Group Processes3
PSY 585Exprment Social PSY3
Six hours of electives **6
Total Hours45

*

In special cases, PSY 597 Readings or another course in one of the content areas (e.g., PSY 588 Intrprsnl Processes) may be substituted for one of the named courses.

**

 Six semester hours, some of which may be from other departments of the University, selected in consultation with the advisor.

Integrated Natural Science Courses

SCI 690. Special Topics in the Natural Sciences for Teachers. 1-4 Hours

Special topical courses covering a science topic for teachers and designed to increase a classroom teacher's content knowledge. This may be offered in the form of a workshop and/or academic year mentoring. 1-4 credit hours.

Psychology Courses

PSY 501. Experimental Design & Statistics. 3 Hours

Study of the logic of the design of experiments in psychology with special emphasis on the use of the analysis of variance. Students will be expected to perform statistical procedures on the computer using canned statistical packages. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate statistics.

PSY 502. Experimental Design & Statistics II. 3 Hours

Further study of the logic of the design of experiments in psychology with special emphasis on the use of bivariate correlation and regression, and multiple regression. Students will be expected to perform statistical procedures on the computer using canned statistical packages. Prerequisite(s): PSY 501.

PSY 506. Selected Topics in Advanced Research Methodology. 3 Hours

Study of special topics in statistics, research design, behavior research methods, and computer technology. The specific topic will vary from one offering to the next. Possible topics include applied multivariate statistics, questionnaire design, evaluation research methods, program evaluation, and performance measurement. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 510. History & Systems. 3 Hours

An extensive survey of the theories and research paradigms that comprise the science of psychology. Topics include an historical overview of the field, the structure of the modern profession, and selected current areas of application and inquiry. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 515. Human Factors. 3 Hours

Treatment of theory, data, and methods that can applied to improve the interface between humans and the systems and products that they use. Human capabilities and limitations are studied to support the design of systems and products for safe and efficient use by the human operator.

PSY 522. Advanced Cognitive Processes. 3 Hours

The study of cognition with attention to current methods, models, and theories. Topics include cognitive neuroscience, perception and pattern recognition, attention and consciousness, memory, knowledge representation, expertise, language, concept formation, problem solving, reasoning anddecision making. Prerequisite(s):Graduate level status in psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSY 524. Human Information Processing. 3 Hours

Current psychological and artificial intelligence models of cognition. Topics include coding mechanisms in the central nervous system, simulation of sensory processes and recognition, computer models of human memory, semantic information processing by humans and machine, fast retrieval theories, recent theories of language comprehension and problem solving. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 525. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Hours

Treatment of cognitive neuroscience including its foundations and methodologies. Topics include methods of cognitive neuroscience, cellular mechanisms and cognition, neuroanatomy and development, sensation and perception, object perception, control of action/motor control, attention, learning and memory, language, consciousness, and hemisphere specialization. Prerequisite(s): PSY522 or permission of instructor.

PSY 528. Psychophysiology. 3 Hours

Neurophysiology of attention, sensation, perception, emotion, learning, memory, and motor control. Emphasis on electrophysiological indicants and cybernetical analyses. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 529. Perception. 3 Hours

Systematic study of methods and research findings in the field of human perception, with an evaluation of theoretical interpretations. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 531. Human Factors in System Development. 3 Hours

Introduction to human factors during the system development process. Treats the design process from initial conceptual stages to final testing and evaluation. Emphasis is upon methods and techniques that permit development of data to support human factors functions throughout the process. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 532. Cognitive Systems. 3 Hours

Cognitive systems provides a framework for analysis and design of complex sociotechnical systems with the objective of supporting the capability of the human operator to perform the cognitive work demanded by such systems. Cognitive work includes functions such as decision making, planning, situation assessment, problem solving, integrating, and coordinating that are performed in a variety of complex systems, such as health care, air traffic control, and transportation.

PSY 533. Engineering Psychology. 3 Hours

Treatment of the relationship between problems in human factors engineering and theory-based research in experimental psychology and human performance. Topics covered include theory and research in such areas as decision-making, attention, perception, and motor performance and their potential application to the design of the person-machine interface in complex systems. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 534. Human Computer Interaction. 3 Hours

A critical review of human factors issues in the design of user interfaces of interactive computer systems. Emphasis will be placed on topics of cognitive engineering as they apply to user-centered systems design. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 535. Ergonomics. 3 Hours

Ergonomics, the study of work, emphasizes the physical aspects, capabilities, and limitations of humans. Students participate in an anthropometric measurement laboratory, employ computerized biomechanical models, and examine the literature in a specific area of interest. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 536. Training System Develpment. 3 Hours

Treatment of the systems approach to training program analysis, design, and evaluation. Topics covered include assessment of training objectives, development of training program content, selection of training media, application of simulation technology, and program evaluation procedures, including transfer of training methodology. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 537. Team & Group Processes. 3 Hours

Study of group processes and theories with special application to team training, communication, performance, and coordination in human factors settings and problems. Group decision making and leadership are also emphasized. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 538. Special Topics: Human Factors. 1-3 Hours

Special topics in human factors.

PSY 550. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours

Introduction to interviewing skills with adults and children. Academic and applied components include supervised practice interviews and documentation. Professional components addressed include diversity, ethics, and mental health systems. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program.

PSY 551. Assessment of Intelligence. 3 Hours

Theoretical rationale and techniques of individual mental testing, with emphasis on the Wechsler Scales (WAIS, WISC, WPPSI) and the Stanford-Binet. Major content areas include theories of intelligence, relevant psychometric principles, clinical interpretation, and current research. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 553. Theories and Research in Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Survey of mental disorders with respect to their characteristics, etiology, and treatment alternatives. Emphasis is on the process of expanding knowledge through research. Practice in the use of the current diagnostic classification system. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 555. Theories of Personality & Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Survey and critical analysis of the major current theories of personality and psychotherapy, integrating their contributions into a diversified, functional, and adaptable approach to therapy. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 556. Assessment of Personality. 3 Hours

Survey of approaches to personality assessment as well as the techniques of administration and interpretation of specific instruments. Emphasis is on the MMPI-2, NEO-PIR, and MCMI-III. Strategies of test construction and evaluation, ethical issues, and research are discussed. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 551, PSY 553) or graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 558. Group Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Survey of theories and techniques of group psychotherapy, including a review of the theoretical and empirical literature, as well as a training group experience. Prerequisite(s): PSY 555; graduate level status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 560. Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Current views of the etiology and differential diagnosis of psychopathological disorders of childhood and adolescence are examined. Relevant therapeutic approaches are presented and evaluated in relation to recent research. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 553, PSY 555; graduate student status in clinical program) or permission of instructor.

PSY 564. Individual Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

In-depth study of the principles and techniques of an integrated approach to individual psychotherapy (humanistic, dynamic, and cognitive-behavioral) as developed from clinical and empirical findings. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 555; graduate student status in clinical program) or permission of instructor.

PSY 565. Ethical & Cultural Issues in Clinical Assessment & Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

An examination of ethical theories and principles applied to clinical assessment and psychotherapy. Issues addressed include ethical frameworks, ethical codes, assessment practices, psychotherapy techniques, and common problems arising in clinical practice. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 566. Marriage & Family Therapy. 3 Hours

Survey of the major therapeutic approaches to family and marital problems and related research findings. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 555; graduate student status in clinical program) or permission of instructor.

PSY 567. Special Topics in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours

A variable topics course on issues relevant to the training of students preparing for work in clinical psychology. May be repeated with different topics. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 569. Clinical Practicum. 1 Hour

Experience in interviewing, psychological testing and therapy is acquired through placement in approved mental health agencies. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in the clinical program.

PSY 573. Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours

The science of human development with emphasis on theory, research methods, findings and applications. Topics selected from but not limited to personality and social development, language acquisition, problem-solving, attachment, sex roles, children's rights, moral and prosocial behavior, family relations and extrafamilial influences such as television and schools. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status or permission of instructor.

PSY 574. Cognitive Development in Children. 3 Hours

Major approaches to the study of cognitive development: attentional and mediational development as demonstrated in children's learning, memory, and problem solving; language development and Piaget's theory. Prerequisite(s): PSY 452; (graduate status or permission of instructor).

PSY 585. Experimental Social Psychology. 3 Hours

Designed to provide information and perspective about such social psychological topics as attitude change, interpersonal attraction, social influence, attribution, aggression, helping and intrinsic motivation. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status.

PSY 588. Interpersonal Process. 3 Hours

Seminar in research in some prominent sub-areas of social psychology. Emphasis on critical skills and research ideas in topics such as non-verbal communication, self-disclosure, affiliation and attraction, and equity theory. Prerequisite(s): PSY 585 or permission of instructor.

PSY 595. Seminar in Special Topics in Psychology. 1-3 Hours

Various topics of special interest to faculty and students. An intensive critical evaluation of the appropriate literature. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status or permission of instructor.

PSY 596. Experimental Research. 1-3 Hours

Individual graduate students explore particular research areas. Under guidance of the instructor, research projects are formulated and conducted. Project reports are required. May be repeated. Prerequisites(s): Permission of instructor.

PSY 597. Readings. 1-3 Hours

Designed for individual, student-faculty study in a specialized area of interest. Topic and criteria for evaluation to be specified prior to registration. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

PSY 599. Thesis. 3 Hours

An original research project incorporating an appropriate review of theory and literature and demonstrating competence in the application of research methodology. Required of all graduate students.