Psychology

Courses

PSY 101. Introductory Psychology. 3 Hours

Study of human behavior including development, motivation, emotion, personality, learning, perception; general application of psychological principles to personal, social, and industrial problems. Students must participate in departmental research.

PSY 201. Sophomore Seminar: Psychology as a Science and Profession. 1 Hour

Introduction to the science and profession of psychology including the nature and breadth of psychological study and career exploration. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 216. Elementary Statistics. 3 Hours

Basic probability and applied statistics: measures of central tendency and dispersion, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, tests between means, linear regression, correlation, and ANOVA. Prerequisite(s): MTH 102 or higher; PSY 101.

PSY 217. Research Methods. 3 Hours

Basic concepts of scientific methods as applied to psychological problems. Experiments to familiarize students with application of scientific methodology to study of human psychological processes. Required of all psychology majors. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101, PSY 216.

PSY 251. Human Growth & Development. 3 Hours

Focuses on stages of human development from infancy through the aging adult. Emphasis is on various theoretical approaches and the development associated with each stage. Psychology majors may not take for credit toward major. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 317. Advanced Research Methods. 3 Hours

Advanced application of statistical and research methods learned in PSY 216 and PSY 217 to the design, analysis, and write-up of an original empirical study. Research area will vary according to instructor expertise. Prerequisite(s): PSY 217.

PSY 321. Cognition. 3 Hours

Information-processing approach to attention, perception, memory, imagery, and thought. Theoretical structures including neuron modeling of higher cognitive and experimental processes. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 322. Learning. 3 Hours

Foundations of the learning process. Classical and instrumental paradigms and variants of each considered in preparation for investigations of complex learning. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 323. Psychology of Perception. 3 Hours

Introduction to major theoretical and experimental work in perception, including visual, auditory, proprioceptive, and other sensory systems. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 333. Psychological Tests & Measurements. 3 Hours

Survey of major tests of intelligence, aptitude, interest, and personality presently used in clinics, schools, personnel offices, and research settings. Emphasis on evaluation and comparison, rationale of construction, ethical considerations. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 101, PSY 216) or equivalent.

PSY 334. Industrial Psychology. 3 Hours

Introduction to modern efforts to improve human performance in industrial organizations and society; selection and placement of employees, morale, training, and incentives. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 341. Social Psychology. 3 Hours

Survey of major theoretical and experimental work in the field; attitudes, conformity, emotions, group dynamics.

PSY 344. Interpersonal Relationships. 3 Hours

Social psychological research in nonverbal behavior, social exchange, self-disclosure, and interpersonal attraction and how these are related to developing relationships. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 351. Child Psychology. 3 Hours

Study of psychological processes from the developmental point of view; changes in perception, cognition, emotion, and social behavior from infancy to adolescence. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 353. The Psychology of Adult Development & Aging. 3 Hours

Provides a general introduction to the multi-disciplinary field of adulthood and aging with a specific focus on aspects of interest to psychologists: cognitive, intellectual, personality, and biological changes across adult development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 355. Developmental Psychopathology. 3 Hours

Survey of developmental theory and research related to the psychopathology of infants, children, and adolescents. Focus is on etiology, identification, and intervention. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 101, PSY 351) or permission of instructor.

PSY 361. Personality. 3 Hours

Introduction to the study of personality through analysis of such major theories as those of Freud, Skinner, Maslow, and Rogers. The development of personality and the stability of personality characteristics over time. Review of clinical and experimental findings. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 363. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Hours

Patterns of disordered behavior; social, psychological, and physiological factors; theoretical explanations of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 364. Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Survey of current types of psychotherapy. Emphasis on similarities and differences in underlying theories of behavioral change and associated techniques. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 366. Health Psychology. 3 Hours

Explores psychological research, theory, and techniques in health-related areas, such as health promotion, the identification of contributors to illness, illness prevention, stress and coping, stress management, changing health beliefs and behavior, pain and its management, and the management of chronic and terminal illnesses.

PSY 368. Community Psychology. 3 Hours

The application of psychological principles to the understanding and prevention of prevalent community problems including teen pregnancy, school violence, mental illness, substance abuse, homelessness and poverty. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 375. Psychology of the Arts. 3 Hours

Explores the psychological experiences associated with the creation and appreciation of music, art, and literature. Course content is presented in terms of the theories, methods, and research findings in the fields of perception, cognition, and development.

PSY 390. Forensic Psychology. 3 Hours

Exploration of psychological research, theory, and techniques in the intersection of psychology and the law, such as police psychology, criminal investigation techniques, interrogations and false confessions, eyewitness identifications, risk assessments, issues of competency, trial consulting, and influencing public policy. Equipping students with this information and familiarizing them with their legal rights will contribute to their ability to protect themselves from injustice. They are also encouraged to work toward social justice for all citizens, particularly the most vulnerable in our communities. Prerequisite(s): SSC 200.

PSY 410. Questionnaire Design. 3 Hours

Students will learn about critical issues in questionnaire design and use, the advantages/disadvantages of questionnaires, types of questionnaires, questionnaire development strategies, scale selection, and how to evaluate questionnaires. Students will develop, test and evaluate a questionnaire in a domain of interest to them. Depending on the size of the effort, students may work in teams.

PSY 422. Biopsychology. 3 Hours

Neurophysiological analysis of attention, sensation, perception, emotion, motivation, and learning. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 431. Interviewing & Counseling. 3 Hours

Integrated approach to the theory, techniques, skills, and values of interviewing and counseling. Practice through written assignments, self study, classroom exercises, and role-playing. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 435. Human Factors. 3 Hours

Students learn methods to improve the interface between humans and their environment. Human characteristics are studied to determine the best way to design the task, product, workstation, or other environmental features to accommodate the human. Students in the School of Engineering must have junior or senior status.

PSY 443. Women, Gender, and Psychology. 3 Hours

Survey of a wide range of topics pertaining to women, and gender more broadly. Such topics include, but are not limited to gender role development, gender differences and similarities, sexual orientation, mental health, interpersonal relationships, and victimization. The format of this course is a combination of lectures, group activities, and out-of-class experiential learning. This course fulfills the CAP Diversity and Social Justice Requirement and one of the requirements for both the Women's and Gender Studies Minor and Major. Prerequisite(s): SSC 200.

PSY 444. Environmental Psychology. 3 Hours

Study of the effects of the physical and social environment on human behaviors, attitudes, and affective responses. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 101, PSY 341) or permission of instructor.

PSY 445. Technology, Environment & Behavior. 3 Hours

Examines the cultural bases for the individual and societal choices which humans make about their use of technology. Technology is broadly defined to include human-machine systems.

PSY 450. Psychology for Ministry. 3 Hours

Human development and adjustment, interpersonal communication, and the psychology of religion. Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Lay Ministry Program or permission of instructor.

PSY 451. Psychology of Religion. 3 Hours

Addresses the psychological study of the nature of religion and religious experience; explores the development of internalized beliefs, attitudes, and values and the effect they have on individual functioning. An introductory course in psychology is highly recommended. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

PSY 452. Cognitive Development in Children. 3 Hours

Major approaches to the study of cognitive development; attentional and mediational development in children's learning, memory, and problem solving; language development and Piaget's theory. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 101, PSY 351) or permission of instructor.

PSY 461. Current Implications of Drug Dependency. 3 Hours

Survey of effects, symptoms, treatment, causalities, and myths associated with drug use and abuse. Emphasis on existing treatment methods and psychological implications of drug dependency. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 462. Human Sexuality. 3 Hours

Psychological factors in human sexuality including developmental, biological, and social perspectives. Such topics as sexual orientation, gender identity and roles, sexual relationships, sexual dysfunction, power and violence, and commercialization.

PSY 471. History of Psychology. 3 Hours

The evolution of psychology from its origins in philosophy, science, clinical, and applied settings. Emphasis on integrating these systems and schools of thought with modern psychology. Students will produce a scholarly work which will be presented publicly. Students will reflect on how the various schools of thought influence the purpose of their life, their proposed work and how they, in the profession of Psychology, might serve the community. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101; At least three of PSY 321, PSY 322, PSY 323, PSY 422, PSY 341, PSY 351, PSY 361, PSY 363 (the core areas of psychology); Seniors only.

PSY 477. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

First of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and department chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approval of University Honors Program.

PSY 478. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

Second of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and department chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approved 477; approval of University Honors Program.

PSY 480. Senior Seminar in Psychology. 3 Hours

Advanced exploration of the meaning of scholarship to the vocation of psychology. Students will engage in critical review of readings in psychology and develop a scholarly project consistent with discipline standards and suited to the professional goals of the student. Prerequisite(s): PSY 217.

PSY 490. Internship in Psychology. 1-6 Hours

Supervised experience arranged on an individual basis in appropriate settings. For junior or senior psychology majors who have completed prescribed course work only. Consult internship director for details. May be repeated up to six semester hours. Grade Option Two only.

PSY 493. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours

Problems of special interest investigated under faculty direction. Area and criteria for evaluation to be specified prior to registration. May be repeated up to six semester hours. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

PSY 494. Readings in Psychology. 1-6 Hours

Directed reading in a specific area of interest, under faculty supervision. Topic and criteria for evaluation to be specified prior to registration. May be repeated up to six semester hours. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

PSY 495. Special Topics in Psychology. 1-3 Hours

Topics of special interest to faculty and students; intensive critical evaluation of appropriate literature. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

PSY 497. Service Learning Experience. 1 Hour

Supervised community research or service experience that complements a specific upper division course in Psychology. Repeatable up to three semester hours. Corequisite(s): A 300-400 level Psychology course.

PSY 499. Independent Research Capstone. 3 Hours

Project and presentation of special interest investigated under faculty direction. Students will produce a scholarly work which will be presented publicly. Students will reflect on how psychological research will influence their professional life as a psychologist, the implications of that for their own life, and how they, in the profession of Psychology, serve the community. PSY 478H and PSY 499 cannot both be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): PSY 216; PSY 217; At least three of PSY 321, PSY 322, PSY 323, PSY 422, PSY 341, PSY 351, PSY 361, PSY 363 (the core areas of psychology); Seniors only.

PSY 501. Experimental Design & Statistics. 3 Hours

Study of the logic of the design of experiments in psychology with special emphasis on the use of the analysis of variance. Students will be expected to perform statistical procedures on the computer using canned statistical packages. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate statistics.

PSY 502. Experimental Design & Statistics II. 3 Hours

Further study of the logic of the design of experiments in psychology with special emphasis on the use of bivariate correlation and regression, and multiple regression. Students will be expected to perform statistical procedures on the computer using canned statistical packages. Prerequisite(s): PSY 501.

PSY 506. Selected Topics in Advanced Research Methodology. 3 Hours

Study of special topics in statistics, research design, behavior research methods, and computer technology. The specific topic will vary from one offering to the next. Possible topics include applied multivariate statistics, questionnaire design, evaluation research methods, program evaluation, and performance measurement. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 510. History & Systems. 3 Hours

An extensive survey of the theories and research paradigms that comprise the science of psychology. Topics include an historical overview of the field, the structure of the modern profession, and selected current areas of application and inquiry. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 515. Human Factors. 3 Hours

Treatment of theory, data, and methods that can applied to improve the interface between humans and the systems and products that they use. Human capabilities and limitations are studied to support the design of systems and products for safe and efficient use by the human operator.

PSY 522. Advanced Cognitive Processes. 3 Hours

The study of cognition with attention to current methods, models, and theories. Topics include cognitive neuroscience, perception and pattern recognition, attention and consciousness, memory, knowledge representation, expertise, language, concept formation, problem solving, reasoning anddecision making. Prerequisite(s):Graduate level status in psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSY 524. Human Information Processing. 3 Hours

Current psychological and artificial intelligence models of cognition. Topics include coding mechanisms in the central nervous system, simulation of sensory processes and recognition, computer models of human memory, semantic information processing by humans and machine, fast retrieval theories, recent theories of language comprehension and problem solving. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 525. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Hours

Treatment of cognitive neuroscience including its foundations and methodologies. Topics include methods of cognitive neuroscience, cellular mechanisms and cognition, neuroanatomy and development, sensation and perception, object perception, control of action/motor control, attention, learning and memory, language, consciousness, and hemisphere specialization. Prerequisite(s): PSY522 or permission of instructor.

PSY 528. Psychophysiology. 3 Hours

Neurophysiology of attention, sensation, perception, emotion, learning, memory, and motor control. Emphasis on electrophysiological indicants and cybernetical analyses. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 529. Perception. 3 Hours

Systematic study of methods and research findings in the field of human perception, with an evaluation of theoretical interpretations. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 531. Human Factors in System Development. 3 Hours

Introduction to human factors during the system development process. Treats the design process from initial conceptual stages to final testing and evaluation. Emphasis is upon methods and techniques that permit development of data to support human factors functions throughout the process. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 532. Cognitive Systems. 3 Hours

Cognitive systems provides a framework for analysis and design of complex sociotechnical systems with the objective of supporting the capability of the human operator to perform the cognitive work demanded by such systems. Cognitive work includes functions such as decision making, planning, situation assessment, problem solving, integrating, and coordinating that are performed in a variety of complex systems, such as health care, air traffic control, and transportation.

PSY 533. Engineering Psychology. 3 Hours

Treatment of the relationship between problems in human factors engineering and theory-based research in experimental psychology and human performance. Topics covered include theory and research in such areas as decision-making, attention, perception, and motor performance and their potential application to the design of the person-machine interface in complex systems. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 534. Human Computer Interaction. 3 Hours

A critical review of human factors issues in the design of user interfaces of interactive computer systems. Emphasis will be placed on topics of cognitive engineering as they apply to user-centered systems design. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 535. Ergonomics. 3 Hours

Ergonomics, the study of work, emphasizes the physical aspects, capabilities, and limitations of humans. Students participate in an anthropometric measurement laboratory, employ computerized biomechanical models, and examine the literature in a specific area of interest. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 536. Training System Develpment. 3 Hours

Treatment of the systems approach to training program analysis, design, and evaluation. Topics covered include assessment of training objectives, development of training program content, selection of training media, application of simulation technology, and program evaluation procedures, including transfer of training methodology. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 537. Team & Group Processes. 3 Hours

Study of group processes and theories with special application to team training, communication, performance, and coordination in human factors settings and problems. Group decision making and leadership are also emphasized. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in psychology or permission of instructor.

PSY 538. Special Topics: Human Factors. 1-3 Hours

Special topics in human factors.

PSY 550. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours

Introduction to interviewing skills with adults and children. Academic and applied components include supervised practice interviews and documentation. Professional components addressed include diversity, ethics, and mental health systems. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program.

PSY 551. Assessment of Intelligence. 3 Hours

Theoretical rationale and techniques of individual mental testing, with emphasis on the Wechsler Scales (WAIS, WISC, WPPSI) and the Stanford-Binet. Major content areas include theories of intelligence, relevant psychometric principles, clinical interpretation, and current research. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 553. Theories and Research in Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Survey of mental disorders with respect to their characteristics, etiology, and treatment alternatives. Emphasis is on the process of expanding knowledge through research. Practice in the use of the current diagnostic classification system. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 555. Theories of Personality & Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Survey and critical analysis of the major current theories of personality and psychotherapy, integrating their contributions into a diversified, functional, and adaptable approach to therapy. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 556. Assessment of Personality. 3 Hours

Survey of approaches to personality assessment as well as the techniques of administration and interpretation of specific instruments. Emphasis is on the MMPI-2, NEO-PIR, and MCMI-III. Strategies of test construction and evaluation, ethical issues, and research are discussed. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 551, PSY 553) or graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 558. Group Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Survey of theories and techniques of group psychotherapy, including a review of the theoretical and empirical literature, as well as a training group experience. Prerequisite(s): PSY 555; graduate level status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 560. Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

Current views of the etiology and differential diagnosis of psychopathological disorders of childhood and adolescence are examined. Relevant therapeutic approaches are presented and evaluated in relation to recent research. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 553, PSY 555; graduate student status in clinical program) or permission of instructor.

PSY 564. Individual Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

In-depth study of the principles and techniques of an integrated approach to individual psychotherapy (humanistic, dynamic, and cognitive-behavioral) as developed from clinical and empirical findings. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 555; graduate student status in clinical program) or permission of instructor.

PSY 565. Ethical & Cultural Issues in Clinical Assessment & Psychotherapy. 3 Hours

An examination of ethical theories and principles applied to clinical assessment and psychotherapy. Issues addressed include ethical frameworks, ethical codes, assessment practices, psychotherapy techniques, and common problems arising in clinical practice. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 566. Couples & Family Therapy. 3 Hours

Survey of the major therapeutic approaches to family and couple relationship problems and related research findings. Prerequisite(s): (PSY 555; graduate student status in clinical program) or permission of instructor.

PSY 567. Special Topics in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours

A variable topics course on issues relevant to the training of students preparing for work in clinical psychology. May be repeated with different topics. Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status in clinical program or permission of instructor.

PSY 569. Clinical Practicum. 1 Hour

Experience in interviewing, psychological testing and therapy is acquired through placement in approved mental health agencies. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status in the clinical program.

PSY 573. Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours

The science of human development with emphasis on theory, research methods, findings and applications. Topics selected from but not limited to personality and social development, language acquisition, problem-solving, attachment, sex roles, children's rights, moral and prosocial behavior, family relations and extrafamilial influences such as television and schools. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status or permission of instructor.

PSY 574. Cognitive Development in Children. 3 Hours

Major approaches to the study of cognitive development: attentional and mediational development as demonstrated in children's learning, memory, and problem solving; language development and Piaget's theory. Prerequisite(s): PSY 452; (graduate status or permission of instructor).

PSY 585. Experimental Social Psychology. 3 Hours

Designed to provide information and perspective about such social psychological topics as attitude change, interpersonal attraction, social influence, attribution, aggression, helping and intrinsic motivation. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status.

PSY 588. Interpersonal Process. 3 Hours

Seminar in research in some prominent sub-areas of social psychology. Emphasis on critical skills and research ideas in topics such as non-verbal communication, self-disclosure, affiliation and attraction, and equity theory. Prerequisite(s): PSY 585 or permission of instructor.

PSY 595. Seminar in Special Topics in Psychology. 1-3 Hours

Various topics of special interest to faculty and students. An intensive critical evaluation of the appropriate literature. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status or permission of instructor.

PSY 596. Experimental Research. 1-3 Hours

Individual graduate students explore particular research areas. Under guidance of the instructor, research projects are formulated and conducted. Project reports are required. May be repeated. Prerequisites(s): Permission of instructor.

PSY 597. Readings. 1-3 Hours

Designed for individual, student-faculty study in a specialized area of interest. Topic and criteria for evaluation to be specified prior to registration. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

PSY 599. Thesis. 3 Hours

An original research project incorporating an appropriate review of theory and literature and demonstrating competence in the application of research methodology. Required of all graduate students.