Physics

Courses

PHY 100. Seminar. 0 Hours

Opportunity to become acquainted with the broad spectrum of modern science through periodic meetings with the entire department. Invited speakers, films, student presentations, book reviews, and informal discussions. For all physics, physical science, and physics-computer science majors.

PHY 105. Physical Science - Energy & the Environment. 3 Hours

General introduction to principles of physics including motion, energy, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics. Applications of these principles to non-renewable and renewable energy systems and the climate. Intended for business students.

PHY 108. Physical Science of Light & Color. 3 Hours

Conceptual study of physical science with emphasis on light, color, and the interaction of light with materials.

PHY 108L. Light & Color Laboratory. 1 Hour

Laboratory experiences to accompany PHY 108. Corequisite(s): PHY 108.

PHY 201. College Physics I. 3 Hours

Topics from mechanics, thermal and mechanical properties of matter, wave motion, and sound without the formalism of calculus.

PHY 201L. College Physics Laboratory I. 1 Hour

Algebra-based introductory laboratory. Experimental scientific techniques and the use of standard laboratory equipment. One two-hour period each week. Corequisite(s): PHY 201 or PHY 206.

PHY 202. General Physics. 3 Hours

Continuation of PHY 201 with a treatment of electricity and magnetism, wave motion and properties of light, atomic and nuclear physics. Second term, each year. Prerequisite(s): PHY 201.

PHY 202L. General Physics Laboratory. 1 Hour

Experimental scientific techniques and the use of standard laboratory equipment. One two-hour period per week. Second term, each year. Prerequisite(s): PHY 201L.

PHY 203. Modern Technical Physics. 3 Hours

Introduction to selected topics in modern physics without the formalism of calculus. For engineering technology students. Prerequisite(s): College algebra, trigonometry, and introductory statics and dynamics.

PHY 203L. Technical Physics Laboratory. 1 Hour

Laboratory experiences to accompany PHY 203.

PHY 206. General Physics I - Mechanics. 3 Hours

Calculus-based introductory course in mechanics. Three lectures, one recitation each week. Corequisite(s): MTH 138, MTH 148 or MTH 168.

PHY 207. General Physics II - Electricity & Magnetism. 3 Hours

The basic principles of electricity and magnetism. Three lectures, one recitation each week. Prerequisite(s): PHY 201 or PHY 206. Corequisite(s): MTH 149 or MTH 169.

PHY 208. General Physics III - Mechanics of Waves. 3 Hours

Introduction to wave phenomena (including sound, light, and matter waves) leading to basic concepts in modern physics. Prerequisite(s): (MTH 149; PHY 202) or (MTH 169; PHY 207).

PHY 210L. General Physics Laboratory I. 1 Hour

Introduction to laboratory methods, handling of data, and analysis of results. Experiments appropriate to the background of students with an interest in mathematical and physical sciences. Two hours laboratory, one hour recitation each week. Corequisite(s): PHY 206.

PHY 211L. General Physics Laboratory II. 1 Hour

Laboratory methods, data handling, and analysis of results. Experiments appropriate to the background of students with an interest in mathematical and physical sciences. Two hours laboratory, one hour recitation each week. Prerequisite(s): PHY 210L. Corequisite(s): PHY 207.

PHY 220. Energy & Environmental Physics. 3 Hours

Introduction to the physical basis of energy systems and the climate. Topics covered will include thermodynamics, planetary radiation balance, heat transfer, basic atmospheric and ocean physics, nuclear energy, renewable energy, modeling of carbon emissions from fossil fuels, simple climate models, monitoring climate change, and mitigation strategies. Prerequisite(s): PHY 206.

PHY 232. The Physics of Waves. 3 Hours

Physical concept and mathematical relations describing wave phenomena in a variety of physical systems. Topics include oscillation in mechanical and electrical systems, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, geometrical and physical optics and matter waves. Designed for electrical and computer engineering students, but open to all meeting the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): PHY 206; MTH 169 (may be taken as a corequisite).

PHY 250. Descriptive Astronomy. 3-4 Hours

Descriptive survey for students who have had little or no previous exposure to astronomy; material from ancient times to present, including pulsars and quasi-stellar objects.

PHY 295. Research Participation I. 1 Hour

No description available.

PHY 301. Thermal Physics. 3 Hours

Thermodynamical descriptions of many particle systems obtained from microscopic statistical considerations; laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of dilute gases, and Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 208 or PHY 232. Corequisite(s): MTH 219.

PHY 303. Intermediate Mechanics I. 3 Hours

The fundamental concepts of mechanics: virtual work, kinematics, special theory of relativity, Lagrange's equation-and central forces, particle dynamics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 208 or PHY 232. Corequisite(s): MTH 219.

PHY 321. Atomic & Nuclear Physics. 3 Hours

Concepts and models of the structure of matter; atoms, ions, electrons and nuclei, radioactivity, interactions of radiation with matter, particle detection, accelerators, nuclear models, nuclear reactions and processes, and fundamental particles. Prerequisite(s): (PHY 208 or PHY 232) or permission of instructor.

PHY 323. Computational Physics. 3 Hours

The course will explore how computers are used in physics. Topics will include simulations of physical systems, numerical analysis, and the use of mathematical analysis packages (MATHCAD, for example.) Programming will be done in True BASIC and MATHCAD. Prerequisite(s): MTH 218; (PHY 208 or PHY 232).

PHY 333. Digital & Analog Electronics for Scientists. 3 Hours

Basic concepts of digital and analog integrated circuit electronics are developed as a way to understand modern microcomputer based instrumentation. A microcomputer based data collection and analysis system is used to study binary data input and output, analog to digital conversion (ADC) devices, digital to analog conversion (DAC) devices, and other digital integrated circuits and concepts. The analog electronics part of the course begins with a study of discrete analog devices and ends with operational amplifiers and their application. Two hours lecture and two hour laboratories each week. Prerequisite(s): (PHY 202L or PHY 211L) or equivalent.

PHY 390. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. 3 Hours

Basic postulates of quantum mechanics with applications made to atomic physics. Prerequisite(s): MTH 219; (PHY 208 or PHY 232). Corequisite(s): MTH 310.

PHY 395. Research Participation I. 1-6 Hours

Individual projects conducted as part of the physics Undergraduate Research Participation program to encourage involvement of students with faculty researchers. Projects must be arranged in advance with faculty research directors.

PHY 399. Special Problems in Physics. 1-4 Hours

Special topical courses, laboratory, tutorial, or library work in areas of current interest. Students should consult the composite.

PHY 403. Intermediate Mechanics II. 3 Hours

Emphasis on solving physical problems; noninertial coordinate systems, rigid body motion, rotating systems, coupled systems, introductory fluid statics and dynamics, normal coordinates, and the descriptions of mechanics appropriate for the transition to wave mechanics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 303.

PHY 404. Physical Optics. 3 Hours

The electromagnetic wave theory of light, propagation of waves, reflection, refraction, dispersion, polarization, dichroism, birefringence, superposition of waves, interference, diffraction, Fourier optics. Prerequisite(s): MTH 219; (PHY 208 or PHY 232).

PHY 408. Intermediate Electricity & Magnetism I. 3 Hours

Electrostatics, Coulumb's law, Gauss's law, potential, dielectric materials, electrostatic energy, solutions to Laplace's and Poisson's equations, Biot-Savart law, Faraday induction law, magnetization, and Maxwell's equations. Prerequisite(s): MTH 219; (PHY 208 or PHY 232).

PHY 409. Intermediate Electricity & Magnetism II. 3 Hours

Further study of electric and magnetic fields with emphasis on solving problems; Maxwell's equations, propagation of electromagnetic waves, electromagnetic radiation. Prerequisite(s): PHY 408.

PHY 411. Topics in Modern Physics. 3 Hours

Elements of modern optics, solid state and other selected subjects. Consult chairperson for details. Prerequisite(s): PHY 390 or equivalent.

PHY 420. Introduction to Solid State. 3 Hours

Classification of solids, crystals and crystal structures, survey of lattice properties, free electron theory, band theory of solids, semi-conductors, and crystal imperfections. Prerequisite(s): MTH 219; (PHY 208 or 232); PHY 390.

PHY 430. Advanced Lab I. 2 Hours

No description available.

PHY 431. Advanced Lab II. 2 Hours

No description available.

PHY 440. Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Hours

Study of selected principles in quantum mechanics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 390.

PHY 450. Senior Project. 3 Hours

The senior project is a capstone experience for senior physics majors. It will consist of a research project of the student's choosing and will require both an oral and written report. The nature and scope of the project will be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor. Permission of the department chairperson is required. Senior physics majors only.

PHY 460. Seminar. 1 Hour

Presentation of papers by undergraduate students, faculty, and a guest lecturers on topics of concern to the modern physicist. Reviews of books and films appropriate to the group.

PHY 477. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

First of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and department chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approval of University Honors Program.

PHY 478. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Hours

Second of two courses leading to the selection, design, investigation, and completion of an independent, original Honors Thesis project under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Restricted to students in the University Honors Program with permission of the program director and department chairperson. Students pursuing an interdisciplinary thesis topic may register for three semester hours each in two separate disciplines in consultation with the department chairpersons. Prerequisite(s): Approved 477; approval of University Honors Program.

PHY 480. Physics Capstone. 1 Hour

This seminar course is the capstone for all physics majors. Students will complete an independent research project and present their results in written form and in a presentation. Students will learn about the variety of career paths available after completing an undergraduate physics degree, and how to engage in these career paths in an ethical manner.

PHY 495. Research Participation II. 1-6 Hours

Individual projects conducted as part of the physics Undergraduate Research Participation program to encourage involvement of students with faculty researchers. Projects must be arranged in advance with faculty research directors.

PHY 499. Special Problems in Physics. 1-6 Hours

Laboratory, tutorial, or library work in one of such selected topics as solid state physics, polymers, atomic and nuclear physics, modern optics, theoretical physics, surface physics, or general physics. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chairperson.

PHY 520. Solid State Physics. 3 Hours

Solid State Physics.

PHY 525. Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Hours

The physical basis of quantum mechanics, wave packets, free particle motion: Schrodinger's equation applied to potential problems; harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom; three-dimensional extrapolation and scattering.

PHY 570. Computational Physics. 3 Hours

Computational physics is the use of physics, mathematics and computer science to study the behavior of complex systems by computer simulation. The course refines computational skills by providing direct experience in using a computer to solve physics problems in science and engineering. Pre-requisite(s): MTH 219 or equivalent or permission of department chairperson.

PHY 599. Introduction to Lasers. 1-3 Hours

Laser theory; coherence; Gaussian beams; optical resonators; properties of atomic and molecular radiation; laser oscillation and amplification; methods of excitation of lasers; characteristics of common lasers; laser applications.